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KS4 Exams 2018

Time Table

Time Table
0830 0900 0930 1000 1030 1100 1130 1200 1230 1300 1330 1400 1430 1500
Monday Maths - Paper 1 - 1 hour 15 mins Physical Education - 1 hour 15 mins Geography - 1 hour
Design Technology - 1 hour 30 mins
Tuesday Spanish Writing - 1 hour 15 mins Spanish Reading - 1 hour Religious Studies - 1 hour 15 mins Chemistry - 1 hour 30 mins
Italian Writing - 1 hour 15 mins Italian Reading - 1 hour
Computer Science - 1 hour
Wednesday French Writing - 1 hour 15 mins French Reading - 1 hour Computer Science - 1 hour Biology - 1 hour 30 mins
Thursday History - 1 hour 45 mins Music - 1 hour 30 mins Maths - Paper 2 - 1 hour 15 mins
Friday Food and Nutrition - 1 hour 15 mins Drama - 1 hour 30 mins Physics - 1 hour 30 mins

Revision

General

Year 10 Exam Revision: the ‘Why?’ and the ‘How’?

What Does it Take to Learn Something?

  • ‘Students need to experience at least three different sets of complete information about a concept before it is embedded in their network of knowledge’
  • Teacher controlled learning can account for as little as 50% of what students learn: teacher-designed activities chosen by students can account for another 25% with the final 25% of learning arising from ‘spontaneous talk, self-created activities, or use of resources’
  • Students who learn more do so because they ‘create more learning experiences for themselves’

The Hidden Lives of Learners

What Learning Opportunities can Students Choose or Create?

  • Support sessions and curriculum-related clubs
  • Inquiring Minds lectures
  • Reading ahead and reading around
  • Trips and visits
  • Discussing learning: ‘memory is the residue of thought’ (Daniel Willingham)

Effective Study Strategies

  • Practice testing: retrieving answers from memory boost retention; notes should encourage retrieval practice (e.g. flashcards); continue self- testing until knowledge is secure
  • Distributed practice: ‘cramming’ feels easier as we rapidly become familiar with the material; boosts long term retention; revision becomes on-going
  • Interleaved practice: mix up different sorts of problems; the practice is harder but test performance is improved (no improvement for different types of French vocab.)
  • Elaboration and Generation: why is this true? How could I explain it to someone else? How does this link to what I know already? Can I make sense of this new idea? Can I attempt to answer this question before it is explained to me?

Strengthening the Student Toolbox and Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning

Less Effective Techniques (That Students Use a Lot)

  • Re-reading: ‘does not always enhance students’ understanding of what they read’
  • Highlighting: ‘by focusing on individual concepts whilst highlighting, students [may spend] less time thinking about connections across concepts’
  • Summarising: ‘helpful only with training on how to summarize’

Strengthening the Student Toolbox

Where should you revise?

  • Warm
  • Well lit (a reading lamp reduces eye-strain)
  • Have a clock or watch nearby (time your revision sessions)

How to plan your revision:

  • Have a definite finishing time
  • Plan regular breaks
  • Get up and walk around during your break
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Have a tick list of topics to cover
  • Gradually aim to summarise your notes (If you have the skills to)

Have a proper relaxation plan!

  • 5 minute burst of music
  • 5 minute tea/coffee break
  • A walk on the beach/through the lanes
  • Sitting in the fresh air
  • Breakfast with your friends
  • Cinema
  • Exercise

 

  • Revise the same work again after 10 minutes
  • Briefly review the work:

                              after 1 day

                              after 1 week.

  • This method will fix the work quite firmly into your long-term memory

ABOVE ALL…

PRACTICE PAST PAPERS AND QUESTIONS AS THESE ARE THE BEST WAY TO HELP YOU DO WELL

Download Here : GCSE revision booklet

Download Here : Personal Revision Timetable

Download Here : Revision Timetable

Download Here : Revision Tips

 

Biology

Use the following checklists to plan your revision and to ensure you have covered all the topics. Tick off the topics as you finish revising them. However, ensure you revisit all topics regularly so you do not forget things you revised early!! Good luck!

Living organisms and Cells Topic Revised?
Characteristics of living organisms: MRS GREIN
Variety of living organisms: key features of plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, protoctists and viruses
Cells: animal and plant cells, specialised cells
Levels of organisation: tissue, organ, system

Biological molecules Topic Revised?
Molecules in organisms: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and water
Enzymes: role of enzymes
Enzymes: effect of temperature
Enzymes: effect of pH
Enzymes: practicals to investigate effects of temperature and pH

Movement in and out of cells Topic Revised?
Diffusion: definition and examples in living organisms
Diffusion: factors affecting rate of diffusion (temperature, diffusion distance, surface area to volume ratio, concentration gradient)
Osmosis: definition and description of process. Examples in living organisms
Osmosis: in plants and animal cells
Active transport: definition and examples in living organisms
Practicals: investigations into diffusion and osmosis in living and non-living systems

Human Nutrition Topic Revised?
Balanced diet: components of a balanced diet and uses of each component in the body
Energy requirements: explanation of differing requirements in different people
Digestive system: structure and function of main organs in digestive system
Practical: determination of energy content of food
Digestion: role of enzymes in digestion
Absorption: role and adaptations of villi and lacteals and use of diffusion and active transport in absorption
Assimilation: uses of biological molecules

Respiration and gas exchange Topic Revised?
Aerobic respiration: word and balanced symbol equation
Anaerobic respiration: word equation and comparison to aerobic
Practicals: to investigate the evolution of carbon dioxide and heat from respiring seeds or other suitable living organisms.
Breathing system: structure and function of parts of breathing system
Ventilation: inhalation and exhalation
Gas exchange: adaptations of alveoli and role of diffusion Smoking: effects on lungs and circulatory system
Practical: to investigate the effect of exercise on breathing in humans

Transport in Humans Topic Revised?
Composition of blood and roles of components
Adaptations of red blood cells
Heart structure and function
Effects of exercise and adrenaline on heart rate
Blood vessels: structure and function
Circulatory systems in other animals
Practical: effect of exercise on heart rate

Transport in Plants Topic Revised?
Role of phloem
Role of xylem
Absorption of water through roots
Transpiration
Factors affecting rate of transpiration
Practicals: investigations into environmental factors affecting rate of transpiration

Gas exchange in plants Topic Revised?
Role of diffusion in relation to gases for photosynthesis and respiration
Changes in gas exchange between day and night
Leaf structure and adaptations
Role of stomata
Practical: the effect of light on net gas exchange from a leaf using hydrogen carbonate indicator

Plant nutrition Topic Revised?
Process and importance of photosynthesis
Word and balanced symbol equation for photosynthesis
Factors affecting rate of photosynthesis
Mineral requirements of plants
Practicals: investigations into production of oxygen and the requirements of carbon dioxide, light and chlorophyll

Communication and control Topic Revised?
Plants: Geotropic and phototropic responses of plants
Practical: demonstration of phototropic and geotropic growth responses
Animals: Stimulus and response involving receptors and effectors
Animals: Definition of Homeostasis and examples of conditions to be controlled
Animals: Sources, roles and effects of ADH, adrenaline, insulin, testosterone, progesterone and oestrogen

Animals: Responses of the body to high and low temperature (thermoregulation) Revised?
Animals: Components of the central nervous system
Animals: Examples of and role of receptors
Animals: Structure and function of reflex arc
Animals: Structure and function of the eye
Animals: Function of the eye in focusing on near and distant objects and in responding to changes in light intensity
Practical: Investigating sensitivity of different areas of the skin

Human effects on the environment Topic Revised?
Air pollution: effects of sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide
Examples of greenhouse gases
Contribution of human activities to greenhouse effect
Effects of global warming
Biological consequences of water pollution
Process and consequences of eutrophication
Effects of deforestation

Download Here : Biology check list

Chemistry
Topic CGP Revision guide GCP Workbook Chemistry for you
Year 9 Topics
Basic concepts
1. States of matter 2 4 19
2. Movement of particles 3 5 18 and 20 - 21
3. Elements compounds and mixtures 8 10 24
4. Separating techniques 8 - 11 11 - 13 27 - 29
Atomic structure and bonding
5. Atoms 6 8 22 and 36 - 42
6. Isotopes and relative atomic mass 7 9 44 - 45
7. The periodic table and electronic structure 13 - 14 14 - 16 112 - 113 and 130 - 131
8. Ionic Bonding 16 - 17 17 76 - 79
9. Covalent bonding 18 - 19 20 - 21 84 - 85
Crude oil
10. Organic compounds 67 (Not alcohols, carboxylic acids, esters) 73 -74 (not Q2, 5 and 6)
11. Naming organic compounds 68 (Not alcohols, carboxylic acids, esters) 75
12. Isomers 69 (Not alcohols, carboxylic acids, esters)
13. Crude oil 70 76 214 - 216
14. Cracking 71 77 218
15. Burning hydrocarbons 72 78 - 79 217
16. Carbon dioxide 40 45 339 - 341
17. Alkanes 73 80 211
18. Alkenes 74 81 219
Metals
19. Reactions of metals</td? 41 46 - 47
20. The reactivity series 42 48 - 49 138, 144 - 145
21. Iron 43 50 148 - 151
22. Metals and redox 44 51 139 - 141
Year 10 Topics
23. Balancing equations 23 24 - 25 30 - 35
24. Relative formula mass 24 25 46
25. Moles 25 27 - 28 48 - 49
26. Calculating masses in reactions 26 29 - 31 58 - 59 and 65
27. Empirical an molecular formulae 27 32 54
28. Finding formulae using experiments 28 33 55
29. Water of crystallisation 29 34
Structure and properties
30. Ionic compounds 17 18 - 19 80 - 81
31. Covalent compounds 20 22 86 - 87, 92 - 93
32. Electrical conductivity 21 (Not metallic bonding) 23 (Not metallic bonding)
33. Electrolysis 32 37 154 - 160
Gases in the atmosphere and chemical tests
34. Gases in the atmosphere 38 43 330
35. Gases in reactions 39 44 332
36. Testing for cations 51 58 370 - 371 and 376
37. Testing for anions 52 59 369 - 369 and 376
38. Tests for gases and water 60 376
Acids, bases and salts
39. Acids and alkalis 46 53 196 - 197
40. Moles and concentration 30 35 52 - 53
41. Reactions of acids 47 54 198 - 201
42. Rules of solubility 49 56 (Q1 only)
43. Making soluble salts 50 57 198 - 201
Energy (part of the energy rates and equilibrium target sheets)
44. Energy transfer 55 61 254, 256 and 258 - 259
45. Measuring enthalpy changes 56 62 257
46. Calculating enthalpy changes 57 63 255
Drama

In the exam, students will answer 4 multiple choice questions on theatre roles and terminology. These are worth just one mark each. They will also answer 4 questions on Blood Brothers and questions will count for a range of marks (4, 8, 12 and 20). They will get one hour to complete the paper. To ensure they are prepared they must...

  • Revise all terminology, theatre roles and responsibilities and theatre space layouts from sheets given out in term one.
  • Read Blood Brothers and ensure you have ideas for all scenes covered so far. These ideas should include all of the following: acting of specific roles, costume design, set design, use of props, other more technical elements e.g. lighting (though this is not a vital aspect as long as students have revised the other suggested aspects).
Food and Nutrition

Revision list for Yr 10 GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition Summative Examination

Using your text books, online resources on Dynamic Learning and your notes, please revise the following topics in preparation for your final Yr 10 exam.

  • Alternative proteins
  • Different types of vegetarianism
  • Macronutrients- Protein, Fats and Carbohydrates
  • Know the differences between saturated and unsaturated fats
  • The role of fibre- know the difference between soluble and insoluble fibre.
  • Read up on Osteoporosis, CHD and coeliac disease
  • Micronutrients- particularly all vitamins- know the chemical names, functions,sources and problems associated with excessive or inadequate vitamin intake.
  • Revise minerals- Iodine and Iron
  • Role of water in the diet
  • Dental health in young children
  • Nutritional needs at different life stages, particularly - Adolescence, Elderly andPregnancy.
  • Heat transfer- Convection, Conduction and Radiation.
  • Know how proteins can be denatured
  • Be able to describe the changes that take place when frying/poaching an egg.
  • Be able to explain gelatinisation- know the names of the starch molecules that causegelatinisation
  • Be able to explain and give examples of ‘foam formation’
  • Know the factors that contribute to childhood obesity
  • Be able to explain how an unhealthy diet in childhood may put future health at risk.
French

The Year 10 exam will be a full GCSE experience.

There are many resources available on Kerboodle.com, an online platform which links to the text book used in class. Log in as follows:
eg. Mary Smith
Username: msmith

Password: msmith Institution code: pb2


Listening - Exam on Tuesday 15th May

This will be a full GCSE listening paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills.

Paper 1 (Listening) – 45 minutes (to take place in normal lesson time on Tuesday 15th May)
Paper 2 (Speaking) – 10 minutes, including role play, photo task and general conversation (to take place on 16/17/18 May)
Paper 3 (Reading) – 1 hour, including translation from French to English
Paper 4 (Writing) – 1 hour 15 mins, including translation from English to French

Topic vocabulary

  • Revise vocabulary from units 1-7
  • Me, my family and friends
  • Technology in everyday life
  • Free time activities
  • Customs and festivals
  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region
  • Social issues (charity work/health)
  • Global issues (environment etc)

Listening skills practice

  • Kerboodle.com - you will find many listening exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class.
  • French radio
  • BBC bitesize

Reading - Exam during exam week

This will be a full GCSE reading paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills.

Topic vocabulary

 

  • Revise vocabulary from units 1-7
  • Me, my family and friends
  • Technology in everyday life
  • Free time activities
  • Customs and festivals
  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region
  • Social issues (charity work/health)
  • Global issues (environment etc)

Reading skills practice

  • Kerboodle.com - you will find many reading exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class
  • French news articles online (eg. yahoo.fr)
  • BBC bitesize

Translation practice

Review articles from units covered so far. Practise translating sections into English


Writing - Exam during exam week

This will be a GCSE paper, including writing tasks and a translation into French

Topic vocabulary

 

  • Revise vocabulary from units 1-7
  • Me, my family and friends
  • Technology in everyday life
  • Free time activities
  • Customs and festivals
  • Home, town, neighbourhood and region
  • Social issues (charity work/health)
  • Global issues (environment etc)

LADRO

  • Link words
  • Adjectives
  • Giving and justifying opinions

Grammar revision

  • Use LanguagesOnline.org.uk to practise grammar topics
  • Your knowledge of the following tenses should be secure:
    • Present tense
    • Passé composé
    • Future (proche and/or simple)
  • When you are confident with these tenses, look at:
    • Imperfect
    • Conditional
  • You may also look at complex structures, such as:
    • Si clauses
    • Après avoir
    • En + present participle
    • Subjunctive examples
    • See 32 points sheet for additional ideas
  • Review also:
    • Adjective agreements
    • Negative structures
    • Comparatives and superlatives
    • Object pronouns

Speaking - Exams to take place 16/17/18th May

Role play

  • Revise role play phrases in handbook
  • Look through role plays in text book
  • See Kerboodle.com for example role plays

Photo card

  • See photo card phrases in handbook
  • Review topic vocab from units 1-6

General conversation

  • Revision based on speaking questions prepared for units 1-6

Accuracy

  • Revision of grammar points for the writing paper will also support your revision for the speaking
Geography

1. Timings and structure

The exam is 1 hour 30 minutes. There are three sections:

Section A – Urban Environments [25 marks]

Section B – Coastal Environments [25 marks]

Section C – Fieldwork on Coasts [25 marks]

The maximum mark for the paper is, therefore, 75 marks.

A good way to ensure that you are giving each question the correct amount of time is to budget your time so that you spend a minute per mark: a 4 mark question should take 4 minutes, a 7 mark question should take 7 minutes.


2. What you need to revise

Section A – Urban

Key ideas Essential content Required case studies

A growing percentage of the world’s population lives in urban areas.

  • The nature of urbanisation (including suburbanisation and counter-urbanisation); the factors affecting the rate of urbanisation and the emergence of mega-cities.
  • The problems associated with rapid urbanisation including congestion, transport, employment, crime and environmental quality.

Investigating change in environmental quality survey (F).

Urban environments can be characterised by the distribution of different land uses and of people of different economic status and ethnic background.

  • Reasons for factors encouraging similar land uses to concentrate in particular parts of the urban area (eg locational needs, accessibility, land values).
  • Consequences of different land uses, eg the distribution of different socio-economic and ethnic groups, accessibility.
  • Implications of rapidly developing urban areas in LICs, eg shanty towns (squatter settlements, location, growth, problems and mitigating strategies including self-help).
  1. 1  Case study of one city to show the land use patterns and the distribution of social/ethnic groups.
  2. 2  Case studies of shanty-town management in a LIC city and the contrast with unmanaged shanty towns.

Investigating change in urban land use (F)

Changes occur as urban environments age and the needs of people change.

  • The nature of, and reasons for, the changes taking place at the edge of HIC cities (eg retail complexes, business parks and industrial estates). The ‘greenfield’ versus ‘brownfield’ debate.
  • Areas of social deprivation and poverty in HIC cities: symptoms and locations. The changing fortunes of inner-city areas.
  • The roles of decision makers (planners, politicians, property developers and industrialists) in urban regeneration and rebranding.

3 Case study of one named urban area in an HIC to explain how and why changes are taking place.


Section B – Coasts

Section A – The Natural Environment Topic 2 – Coastal environments
Key ideas Essential content Scale Required case studies Recommended fieldwork opportunities (F) and practical skills (P)
Physical processes give rise to characteristic coastal landforms.
  • The coast as a natural system and its processes: marine (wave action, erosion, deposition, longshore drift); sub-aerial (weathering, mass movement).
  • Landforms: erosional (headlands and bays; cliffs; wave-cut platforms; caves; arches, stacks and stumps); depositional (beaches, spits, bars).
  • The impact of geology, vegetation, people and sea-level changes on coasts.
Regional and small (local) 1 Case study of two geologically contrasting coastlines. Annotated sketches based on photographs (F/P).

Investigating beach profiles and sediment characteristics (F).

Distinctive ecosystems develop along particular stretches of coastline.
  • Coastal ecosystems (coral reefs, mangroves, sand dunes, salt marshes) and their biodiversity.
  • Physical factors affecting the distributions of coastal ecosystems.
  • Coastal ecosystems are of value to people, but are threatened by tourism and other developments (industrialisation, agricultural practices, deforestation).
Global and small (local) 2 Case study of one coastal ecosystem. Investigation of coastal ecosystems based on maps, photographs and other sources of information (P).
Management of both physical processes and human activities is needed to sustain coastal environments.
  • Conflicts between different users of the coast and between development and conservation.
  • Coastal retreat and its management. Coastal protection: soft and hard engineering; conflicting views.
National, regional and small (local) 3 Case study of a retreating coastline – causes, impacts and management. Investigating the conflicts between development and conservation on a stretch of coastline (F).

Section C – Fieldwork

You will answer a question on either the coasts fieldwork on beach profile and measuring sediment. - see above

3. Answering the questions

There are a number of different types of question you will be asked. Each section will be split up into questions of various lengths. The shortest question on the paper is 1 mark, the longest is 9 marks.

Read each question carefully. The number of marks will give you an indication of how much to write (remember, a minute a mark!). But there are also a number of key words in the question which will determine what you need to write. These include:

Name/ state/ identify – these questions usually call for one word answers

Describe the distribution – this type of question usually refers to a map or diagram; a good rule of thumb is to identify the highs and the lows, and the anomalies – you must also quote figures (do not explain the distribution unless the question explicitly asks you to)

Outline – this instructs you to both describe and explain the subject of the question

Explain / suggest how or why/ describe how/ in what ways – all of these instructions mean the same thing: you are being asked to explain the reason for something, which could be disadvantages or disadvantages or how a particular process works. This type of question always needs an example or case study to support the explanation. We mark these questions to three levels:
Level 1 – a valid reason simply stated
Level 2 – this point is explained, this means linking it to the question
Level 3 – a specific and detailed example is used to support the point

NB Never write out the question again in your answer, this wastes time and space

History - Health and the People

Students will study the importance of the following factors:

  • War
  • Superstition and religion
  • Chance
  • Government
  • Communication
  • Science and technology
  • The role of the individual in encouraging or inhibiting change.

This option focuses on the following questions:

  • Why has there been progress in the health of the British people?
  • How and why has the pace and scale of medical development varied at different times?
  • What impact has medical progress had on people and society?
  • How and why have different factors been more important than others for individual medical developments?
  • What is the significance of key individuals or events in the history of medical development?

Part one: Medicine stands still

Medieval medicine:

  • approaches including natural, supernatural, ideas of Hippocratic and Galenic methods and treatments
  • the medieval doctor
  • training, beliefs about cause of illness.

 

Medical progress:

  • the contribution of Christianity to medical progress and treatment;
  • hospitals
  • the nature and importance of Islamic medicine and surgery
  • surgery in medieval times, ideas and techniques.

Public health in the Middle Ages:

  • towns and monasteries
  • the Black Death in Britain, beliefs about its causes, treatment and prevention.

Part two: The beginnings of change

The impact of the Renaissance on Britain:

  • challenge to medical authority in anatomy, physiology and surgery
  • the work of Vesalius, Paré, William Harvey
  • opposition to change

 

Dealing with disease:

  • traditional and new methods of treatments
  • quackery
  • methods of treating disease
  • plague
  • the growth of hospitals
  • changes to the training and status of surgeons and physicians
  • the work of John Hunter.

Prevention of disease:

  • inoculation
  • Edward Jenner, vaccination and opposition to change.

Part three: A revolution in medicine

The development of Germ Theory and its impact on the treatment of disease in Britain:

  • The importance of Pasteur, Robert Koch and microbe hunting;
  • Pasteur and vaccination;
  • Paul Ehrlich and magic bullets
  • everyday medical treatments and remedies

 

A revolution in surgery:

  • anaesthetics, including Simpson and chloroform
  • antiseptics, including Lister and carbolic acid; surgical procedures
  • aseptic surgery

Improvements in public health:

  • public health problems in industrial Britain
  • cholera epidemics
  • the role of public health reformers
  • local and national government involvement in public health improvement, including the 1848 and 1875 Public Health Acts

Part four: Modern medicine

Modern treatment of disease:

  • the development of the pharmaceutical industry
  • penicillin, its discovery by Fleming, its development
  • new diseases and treatments, antibiotic resistance
  • alternative treatments.

 

The impact of war and technology on surgery:

  • plastic surgery
  • blood transfusions
  • X-rays
  • transplant surgery
  • modern surgical methods, including lasers, radiation therapy and keyhole surgery

Modern public health:

  • the importance of Booth, Rowntree, and the Boer War
  • the Liberal social reforms
  • the impact of two world wars on public health, poverty and housing
  • the Beveridge Report and the Welfare State; creation and development of the National Health Service
  • costs, choices and the issues of healthcare in the 21st century

1) How useful is source...?

Source will be written or visual. Students will need to use the content, provenance and their contextual knowledge in order to evaluate the usefulness of the source. It will target a key event, development, individual or group. Useful/Limitations/Provenance [8 marks] 10 mins

2) Explain the significance of...
It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and specifically assesses the concept of significance. Significance looks at the importance of a key event, person/group or development at the time and importance over time. You must reference two aspects of significance such as short term/ long term, correctness, longevity, impact, consequences. [8 marks] 10 mins

3) Compare... In what ways are they similar?
Must show detailed analysis of BOTH events/people/periods and be able to directly

compare based on two or more elements of similarity. Use specific detail to help. [8 marks] 10 mins

4) Essay question using factors; Judgment on relative importance of an event/person against other factors.

Must show balanced explanation and supported evaluation. It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and developments over time. It will ask students to evaluate one stated factor against other factors. Factors could include war, religion, chance, government, communication, science and technology or the role of an individual. This will be an essay question requiring a judgement. It is an extended response which requires you to demonstrate the ability to construct and develop a sustained line of reasoning which is coherent, relevant, substantiated and logically structured. Marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) will also be available. Necessary but not sufficient, however, at face value, enabling, pivotal moment etc. [16 marks] + 4SPaG 25 minutes

History - Conflict and Tension

This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of different individuals and states including the Great Powers. It looks at concepts such as national self-determination, ideas of internationalism and the challenges of revising the peace settlement. It focuses on the causes of the Second World War and seeks to show how and why conflict occurred and why it proved difficult to resolve the issues which caused it. This study also considers the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change, as well as how they were affected by and influenced international relations.


Part one: Peacemaking

The armistice:

  • aims of the peacemakers
  • Wilson and the Fourteen Points
  • Clemenceau and Lloyd George
  • the extent to which they achieved their aims

 

The Versailles Settlement:

  • Diktat
  • territorial changes
  • military restrictions
  • war guilt and reparations

Impact of the treaty and wider settlement:

  • reactions of the Allies
  • German objections
  • Strengths and weaknesses of the settlement, including the problems faced by new states.

Part two: The League of Nations and international peace

The League of Nations:

 

  • its formation and covenant
  • organisation
  • membership and how it changed the powers of the League
  • the work of the League's agencies
  • the contribution of the League to peace in the 1920s, including the successes and failures of the League, such as the Aland Islands, Upper Silesia, Vilna, Corfu and Bulgaria

 

Diplomacy outside the League:

  • Locarno treaties and the Kellogg-Briand Pact

The collapse of the League:

  • the effects of the Depression
  • the Manchurian and Abyssinian crises and their consequences
  • the failure of the League to avert war in 1939

Part three: The origins and outbreak of the Second World War

The development of tension:

  • Hitler's aims and Allied reactions
  • the Dollfuss Affair
  • the Saar
  • German rearmament, including conscription
  • the Stresa Front
  • Anglo-German Naval Agreement
Escalation of tension:

  • remilitarisation of the Rhineland
  • Mussolini, the Axis and the Anti-CominternPact
  • Anschluss
  • reasons for and against the policy of appeasement
  • the Sudeten Crisis and Munich
  • The ending of appeasement
The outbreak of war:

  • the occupation of Czechoslovakia
  • the role of the USSR and the Nazi-Soviet Pact
  • the invasion of Poland and outbreak of war, September 1939
  • Responsibility for the outbreak of war, including that of key individuals: Hitler, Stalin and Chamberlain

11) Source analysis
You must explain the inference of the source provided, using the source detail and contextual knowledge. [4 marks] 5 mins

12) How useful...
Judgment on relative utility of two sources. Must consider provenance and context of both

sources and reach a judgment (appears can argue both = useful but for different things). [12 marks] 15 mins

13) Write an account...
Explanation of an event/person etc. significance. Must develop several explained reasons in context of period as a whole, using evidence to support. [8 marks] 10 mins

14) Essay Question:
Judgment on relative importance of an event/person/reason against other factors. Must show balanced explanation and supported evaluation.

Necessary but not sufficient, however, at face value, enabling, pivotal moment etc.

[16 marks + 4 spag] 25 mins

Italian

Revision for GCSE Italian Year 10 Exam Week

You will have two exams :

  • -  Listening (45 mins) 18th May (during our lesson time)
  • -  Reading (50 mins) during exam week

The exams will be on all of the GCSE topics, including some which we haven’t covered so far.

We will have seen the structure of these exams in class time and done some practice papers before the exam. The best way to prepare for these is to revise vocabulary from your GCSE vocabulary guide.
The GCSE topics are as follows (topics we have covered are highlighted in yellow):

  • Health p.104-109
  • Relationships and Social Issues p.14-19 and p.162-167
  • Free time p.20-25
  • Holidays p.56-67
  • Home and Local Area p.30-41
  • Environment p.146-145
  • School p.42-47
  • Work p.110-115

You can practice the skills of reading and listening using Edexcel past papers

The exam board we use is AQA but Edexcel uses the same format and topics. Do not use AQA past papers to prepare for your Year 10 exams to ensure you have lots of revision resources for your actual study leave in Year 11.

You should also revise the formation of the past, present and future tenses. You can use the back sections of your Amici textbooks and also Languagesonline.org.uk

Should you require anything else, please ask Miss Morris for extra resources. In bocca al lupo !

 

Maths

In order to do well in your end of year exam you will need to know and understand the mathematical concepts being tested and have practised answering questions that test them.

To test that you know the topics on your revision list you can:

  • Work through the revision sheets provided by the Maths Department. Make a short list oftopics you need to revise thoroughly
  • Go back through your class notes
  • Look at the explanations in your textbook (the page numbers for each topic are on the revision sheet). You can do this online by going to your textbook website (see bottom of page for login details)
  • Read the sections in a revision guide if have one, and make some key revision notes
  • Go through the Lesson for that topic on MyMaths (see bottom of page for login details) , carefully noting anything you need to remember. Find an online revision video on that topic
  • BBC Bitesize is a good place to check your knowledge and learn key facts. Select the” Maths from 2015 onwards” option.

To practice exam questions, several websites publish exam questions organised by topic, with answers. We do the AQA board (which has a particular style of questions) but you could also try questions from other exam boards. The websites below all have questions from exam papers organised by topic. Select the Higher link below or choose topics from the Maths Genie link below (Foundation and Higher topics)

JustMaths.co.uk

MathsGenie.co.uk

PixiMaths.co.uk

Scroll down to the “Aiming for Grade1,3,5,7,9” pages. Don’t be put off by the Grades, just look for the topic you want to revise.

CorbettMaths.com

The Worksheets have video explanations, exam questions and answers on a huge range of topics. The 5-a-day is a favourite for Year 11 students preparing for GCSE Maths!

If you want to see actual exam papers, the AQA sample and specimen papers can be found here.

Finally, during this year you have had several tests. The end of year exam questions will be similar to some of these. Going through the tests will help you check that you understand the material AND refresh your knowledge. They are a very useful revision resource.

Login details:

  • MyMaths.co.uk School login: jersey School p/w: factorise
  • CUP GCSE book:  Username of the form i.surname (i=initial). If you have changed your password and cannot remember it use the Forgot your password? hyperlink under the login box. The default password if you have never logged in is mathsbook1
  • Collins GCSE book:  Select Student and then school and login with username jcg password mathsbook
Music

The Year 10 exam will take the same form as the practice questions you have done this year, as follows:

Section A
Music for a While: Purcell

You should be able to describe these aspects of the piece:

  • Context and background
  • Musical era and other contemporary composers
  • Structure/form
  • Timbre/sonority = Instruments/voices (performing forces) and how used
  • Melody
  • Word setting
  • Rhythm and metre
  • Texture/s
  • Tonality inc. modulations
  • Harmony
  • Dynamics
  • Tempo and changes
  • Compositional devices e.g. sequence, pedal
  • Q5 - Main melody and rhythm for dictation question
  • Q7 - Comparison with an unfamiliar piece

Star Wars main title: John Williams

You should be able to describe these aspects of the piece:

  • Context and background
  • Musical era and other contemporary composers
  • Structure/form
  • Timbre/sonority =Instrumentation (performing forces) and how used
  • Melody
  • Rhythm and metre
  • Texture/s
  • Tonality inc. modulations
  • Harmony
  • Dynamics
  • Tempo and changes
  • Compositional devices e.g. sequence, pedal
  • Q5 - Main melody and rhythm for dictation question
  • Q7 - Comparison with an unfamiliar piece

Killer Queen: Queen

You should be able to describe these aspects of the piece:

  • Context and background
  • Musical era and other contemporary composers
  • Structure/form
  • Timbre/sonority = Instruments/voices (performing forces) and how used
  • Music Technology
  • Melody
  • Word setting and languages
  • Rhythm
  • Texture/s and textural effects
  • Tonality inc. modulations
  • Harmony
  • Dynamics
  • Tempo and changes
  • Compositional devices e.g. sequence, pedal
  • Q5 - Main melody and rhythm for dictation question
  • Q7 - Comparison with an unfamiliar piece

Pathetique Piano Sonata Movement I: Beethoven

You should be able to describe these aspects of the piece:

  • Context and background
  • Musical era and other contemporary composers
  • Development of the piano
  • Structure – sonata form and adaptations
  • Tonality inc. modulations
  • Melody
  • Dynamics
  • Rhythm and metre
  • Texture and register of piano
  • Tempo and changes for different sections
  • Compositional devices e.g. sequence, pedal
  • Piano techniques e.g. hand crossing, rapid figurations
  • Q5 - Main melody and rhythm for dictation question
  • Q7 - Comparison with an unfamiliar piece

Q5 Rhythmic and Melodic dictation

Q6 Keys, chords and their inversions


Section B
Q7 Comparing a set work with an unfamiliar piece

  • You should allow a minimum of 30m for this question
  • The wording of the question will be phrased as:

Evaluate [.......]. You should use your knowledge of musical elements, contexts and language in your response.

  • you will hear the set work once and the unfamiliar work three times
  • you will have a score for each
  • PLAN first(prose notes/bullet points/diagram) and structure your essay:
    • introduction
    • paragraphs containing your arguments
    • conclusion
  • discuss both pieces equally
  • support your observations with score references (bar numbers). You may also refer to other pieces
    you have listened to which you think are appropriate to your answer.
  • use musical vocabulary
Physics

Year 10 Revision List

The end of Year 10 exam may contain content you have studied in Years 9 & 10 “Unit 1: Forces & Motion”, “Unit 2: Electricity”, “Unit 3: Waves”, “Unit 4: Energy resources and energy transfers” and “Unit 5: Solids, Liquids and Gases”.

Resources can be found on the school network:

Target sheets: S:_Subjects AreaScienceYr 9, 10 and 11 Physics course notes and Past paper questionsYears 9 & 10 Target Sheets
Course notes: S:_Subjects AreaScienceYr 9, 10 and 11 Physics course notes and Past paper questionsCourse Notes

Summary booklets: S:_Subjects AreaScienceYr 9, 10 and 11 Physics course notes and Past paper questionsPhysics Summary Booklets


Forces & Motion

Topics

Specification & target sheet reference

Units

1.1

Movement and position

1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 1.9

Vectors & scalars

1.13, 1.14

Force, mass and acceleration

1.15, 1.17

Terminal velocity

1.16, 1.21

Moments (paper 2 only)

1.30P, 1.31P, 1.32P


Electricity

Units

2.1

Mains electricity

2.2

Static electricity (paper 2 only)

2.22P, 2.23P, 2.24P, 2.25P, 2.26P, 2.27P, 2.28P


Waves

Units

3.1

The electromagnetic spectrum

3.10, 3.11, 3.12, 3.13

Refraction

3.14, 3.16, 3.17, 3.18, 3.19

Critical angle

3.20, 3.21, 3.22


Energy resources and energy transfers

Units

4.1

Work and power

4.11, 4.12, 4.13, 4.15, 4.16, 4.17


Solids, liquids and gases

Units

5.1, 5.2

Pressure

5.5

Gas pressure

5.15, 5.18, 5.19, 5.20


Working Scientifically

Graphs

Control, dependent and independent variables

Anomalies and averages

Analysing data & drawing conclusions

RS

The Year 10 exam will take the same form as the assessments this year but will include both religions (Islam and Christianity) and sections on beliefs and teachings and practices (for Islam).

Islam – Beliefs and Teachings

You should be able to write about: Pages
1. The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam and five roots of Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam, including key similarities and differences. 80-84
2. The Oneness of God (Tawhid), Qur’an Surah 112. 85
3. The nature of God: omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice (Adalat in Shi’a Islam), including different ideas about God’s relationship with the world: immanence and transcendence. 85-89
4. Angels, their nature and role, including Jibril and Mika’il. 102-104
5. Predestination and human freedom and its relationship to the Day of Judgement. 107-108
6. Life after death (Akhirah), human responsibility and accountability, resurrection, heaven and hell. 105-106 & 109
7. Prophethood (Risalah) including the role and importance of Adam, Ibrahim and Muhammad. 90-96
8. The holy books:
Qur’an - revelation and authority
97-99
9. The Torah, the Psalms, the Gospel, the Scrolls of Abraham and their authority. 100-101
10. The imamate in Shi’a Islam: its role and significance. 83

Islam – Practices

You should be able to write about: Pages
11. Five Pillars of Sunni Islam and the Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam (students should study the Five Pillars and jihad in both Sunni and Shi’a Islam and the additional duties of Shi’a Islam). 114 & 132-140
12. Shahadah: declaration of faith and its place in Muslim practice. 114
13. Salah and its significance: how and why Muslims pray including times, directions, ablution (wudu), movements (rak’ahs) and recitations; salah in the home and mosque and elsewhere; Friday prayer 115-119 (128- 131)
(Jummah); key differences in the practice of salah in Sunni and Shi’a Islam, and different Muslim views about the importance of prayer.
14. Sawm: the role and significance of fasting during the month of Ramadan including origins, duties, benefits of fasting, the exceptions and their reasons, and the Night of Power, Qur’an 96:1–5. 120-121
15. Zakah: the role and significance of giving alms including origins, how and why it is given, benefits of receipt, Khums in Shi’a Islam. 122-123
16. Hajj: the role and significance of the pilgrimage to Makkah including origins, how hajj is performed, the actions pilgrims perform at sites including the Ka’aba at Makkah, Mina, Arafat, Muzdalifah and their significance. 124-127
17. Jihad: different understandings of jihad: the meaning and significance of greater and lesser jihad; origins, influence and conditions for the declaration of lesser jihad. 137-138
18. Festivals and commemorations and their importance for Muslims in Great Britain today, including the origins and meanings of Id-ul-Adha, Id-ul-Fitr, Ashura. 141-144

Christianity – Beliefs and Teachings

You should be able to write about: Pages
1. The nature of God: God as omnipotent, loving and just, and the problem of evil and suffering 4-8
2. The oneness of God and the Trinity: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. 9-10
3. Different Christian beliefs about creation including the role of Word and Spirit (John 1:1–3 and Genesis 1:1–3). 11-13
4. Different Christian beliefs about the afterlife and their importance, including: resurrection and life after death; judgement, heaven and hell. 14-17

Other helpful websites:

BBC Bitesize
Revision World 

Extra online practice:

All the Islam Resources from lessons: https://1drv.ms/f/s!Al55PHZK0 mYW8xWHJKV3--73oDTQ
All the Christianity resources from lessons: https://1drv.ms/f/s!Al55PHZK0mYWga BswrfIy23TpMBK3w

Spanish

The Year 10 exam will be a full GCSE experience, including:

  • Paper 1 (Listening) – 45 minutes (to take place in normal lesson time during the week beginning 15 May)
  • Paper 2 (Speaking) – 10 minutes, including role play, photo task and general conversation (to take place after half-term)
  • Paper 3 (Reading) – 1 hour, including translation from Spanish to English
  • Paper 4 (Writing) – 1 hour 15 mins, including translation from English to Spanish

There are many resources available on Kerboodle.com, an online platform which links to the text book used in class. Log in as follows:
eg. Mary Smith
Username: msmith

Password: msmith Institution code: pb2


Listening
Exam during week beginning 15th May

This will be a full GCSE listening paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills.

Topic vocabulary

  • Revise vocabulary from units 1-4
  • Family, friends, technology, free-time activities, festivals

Listening skills practice

  • Kerboodle.com - you will find many listening exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class.
  • Spanish radio
  • BBC bitesize

Reading
Exam during exam week

This will be a full GCSE reading paper, covering all topics on the syllabus. We will not have covered some of these in class, but remember this is a skills based exam. Focus on revising vocabulary on the topics already covered and practising listening skills.

Topic vocabulary

  • Revise vocabulary from units 1-4
  • Family, friends, technology, free-time activities, festivals

Reading skills practice

  • Kerboodle.com - you will find many reading exercises on here that you have not yet covered in class
  • Spanish news articles online (eg. yahoo.es/El Pais/El Mundo/Viente Minutos)
  • BBC bitesize

Translation practice

  • Review work completed from units covered so far.
  • Practise translating sections into English

Writing
Exam during exam week

This will be a GCSE paper, including writing tasks and a translation into Spanish

Topic vocabulary

 

  • Revise vocabulary from units 1-4
  • Family, friends, technology, free-time activities, festivals

LADRO

  • Link words
  • Adjectives
  • Giving and justifying opinions

Grammar revision

  • Use LanguagesOnline.org.uk to practise grammar topics
  • Your knowledge of the following tenses should be secure:
    • Present tense
    • Preterite
    • Perfect
    • Future
  • When you are confident with these tenses, look at:
    • Imperfect
    • Conditional
  • You may also look at complex structures, such as:
    • Si clauses
    • Después de haber + past participle
    • Subjunctive examples – es importante que/cuando sea mayor etc.
  • Review also:
    • Adjective agreements
    • Negative structures
    • Comparatives and superlatives
    • Pronouns

Speaking
(Exam during week after half term)

Role play

  • Revise role play phrases in handbook
  • Look through role plays in text book
  • See kerboodle for example role plays

Photo card

  • See photo card phrases in handbook
  • Review topic vocab

General conversation

  • Revision based on speaking questions prepared so far

Accuracy

  • Revision of grammar points for the writing paper will also support your revision for the speaking