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KS3 Exams 2018

KS3 Exam commence the week beginning the 21st of May 2018.


 

Exam Timetables

Year 7
Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5

Monday DT Examination : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.5
Music Lesson : 7.4
Mathematics 1 Examination : All Revision : All History Examination : All DT Examination : 7.4
CS Examination : 7.5

P.E Lesson : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3

Tuesday French Examination : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3
PE Lesson : 7.4, 7.5
Physics Examination : 7.4
PE Lesson : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3
Music Lesson : 7.5
CS Examination : 7.3
French Examination : 7.4, 7.5

Revision : 7.1, 7.2
Physics Examination : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.5
Drama Lesson : 7.4
Music Lesson : 7.3
Drama Lesson : 7.5
Revision : 7.1, 7.2, 7.4

Wednesday English Examination : All Chemistry Examination : 7.2
Revision : 7.1, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5
Chemistry Examination : 7.1, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5
CS Examination : 7.2
Art Examination : All Music Lesson : 7.2
Drama Lesson : 7.3
Revision : 7.1, 7.4, 7.5

Thursday <CS Examination : 7.4
Revision : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, 7.5
Biology Examination : All PE Lesson : 7.4, 7.5
Revision : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3
RS Examination : All PE Lesson : 7.1, 7.2, 7.3
Revision : 7.4, 7.5

Friday CS Examination : 7.1
Revision : 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5
Mathematics 2 Examination : All Music Lesson : 7.1
PE Lesson : 7.4, 7.5
Revision : 7.2, 7.4
Geography Examination : 7.2
Drama Lesson : 7.1
Revision : 7.3, 7.4, 7.5
Geography Examination : 7.2, 7.3, 7.4, 7.5
Drama Lesson : 7.2
Year 8
Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5

Monday RS Examination : 8.2, 8.4, 8.5
CS Examination : 8.3

Drama Lesson : 8.1
CS Examination : 8.4
PE Lesson : 8.1, 8.2, 8.3
Revision : 8.5
RS Examination : 8.1, 8.3
Drama Lesson : 8.2
PE Lesson : 8.4, 8.5
FN Examination : 8.1
Art Examination : 8.2

Drama Lesson : 8.3
Revision : 8.4, 8.5
Biology Examination : All

Tuesday FN Examination : 8.2, 8.3
Music Lesson : 8.1
Drama Lesson : 8.5
Revision : 8.4
CS Examination : 8.1
Geography Examination : 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5
FN Examination : 8.4, 8.5
PE Lesson : 8.1, 8.2, 8.3
Spanish/Italian Examination : All Geography Examination : 8.1
CS Examination : 8.5

Revision : 8.2, 8.3, 8.4

Wednesday Mathematics Examination : All English Examination : All Music Lesson : 8.5
Revision : 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4
PE Lesson : 8.4, 8.5
Revision : 8.1, 8.2, 8.3
Physics Examination : All

Thursday Art Examination : 8.3
Drama Lesson : 8.4
Revision : 8.1, 8.2, 8.5
Art Examination : 8.5
DT Examination : 8.4

PE Lesson : 8.1, 8.2, 8.3
Maths Examination : All French Examination : 8.2
Music Lesson : 8.3
Revision : 8.1, 8.4, 8.5
CS Examination : 8.2
French Examination : 8.1, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5

Friday History Examination: All Art Examination : 8.1
Chemistry Examination : 8.4

Revision : 8.2, 8.3, 8.5
Chemistry Examination : 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, 8.5
Music Lesson : 8.4
DT Examination : 8.2
PE Lesson : 8.4, 8.5
Revision : 8.1, 8.3
DT Examination : 8.1, 8.3, 8.5
Art Examination : 8.4

Music Lesson : 8.2
Year 9
Period 1 Period 2 Period 3 Period 4 Period 5

Monday English Examination : 9.1, 9.2, 9.4, 9.5
Music Lesson : 9.3
Art Examination : 9.3
Revision : 9.1, 9.2, 9.4, 9.5
DT Examination : All English Examination : 9.3
Chemistry Examination : 9.5

Music Lesson : 9.1
Revision : 9.2, 9.4
Chemistry Examination : 9.1, 9.2, 9.4, 9.4
Music Lesson : 9.5

Tuesday Mathematics Examination : All</font Revision : All Spanish/Italian Examination : All CS Examination : 9.2
History Examination : 9.4, 9.5

Revision : 9.1, 9.3
History Examination : 9.1, 9.2, 9.3
PE Lesson : 9.4, 9.5

Wednesday CS Examination : 9.4
Art Examination : 9.5

PE Lesson : 9.1, 9.2, 9.3
Art Examination : 9.2
CS Examination : 9.3

Drama Lesson : 9.1
Music Lesson : 9.4
Revision : 9.5
FN Examination : All Geography Examination : All Drama Lesson : 9.2
PE Lesson : 9.4, 9.5
Revision : 9.1, 9.3

Thursday Physics Examination : All French Examination : 9.3
CS Examination : 9.5

Drama Lesson : 9.4
Revision : 9.1, 9.2
French Examination : 9.2, 9.2, 9.4, 9.5
Drama Lesson : 9.3
PE Lesson : 9.1, 9.2, 9.3
Revision : 9.4, 9.5
Biology Examination : All

Friday Music Lesson : 9.2
Revision : 9.1, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5
Mathematics 2 Examination : All Art Examination : 9.1
Drama Lesson : 9.5
Revision : 9.2, 9.3, 9.4
RS Examination : 9.1
Art Examination : 9.4

Revision : 9.2, 9.3, 9.5
CS Examination : 9.1
RS Examination : 9.2, 9.3, 9.4, 9.5

Year 7 Revision Lists

French

What do I need to revise for the end of year assessment? 

You will be tested on the following topics:

TOPIC VOCABULARY LIST
(Allez 1)
Personality (adjectives describing people) (p.22-23) p.39 UNIT 2
Family members (p.24-25) p.39
Friends (p.28-29) p.39
Animals (p.44-49) P.57 UNIT 3
Town (where you can go) (p.76-77) p.93 UNIT 5
Town (what you can do) (p.78-79) p.93
Food & Drink (p.59-59) p.75 UNIT 4
Food & Drink Opinions (p.60-61) p.75
Food & Drink (Je voudrais + restaurants) (p.62-63) p.75
Food & Drink (Quantities) (p.64-65) p.75

GRAMMAR ALLEZ 1 Extra Practice
Adjectives p.8 (p.166)
The irregular verb AVOIR (to have) p.8 p.14 ex.3
How to say ‘a/an/some’ in French (un/une/des) p.10 p.14 ex.1
C’est (it is) p.10
The irregular verb ÊTRE (to be) p.22
Adjectives p.23 (p.166) p.32 ex.4 / p.50 ex.1
Possessive Adjectives (my-mon/ma/mes…) p.25 p.32 ex.3
Connectives p.27
(Pronouns) Le, La, Les (the + him/her/them) p.28 (p.166) p.32 ex.2
Present tense of AVOIR and ÊTRE p.32 ex.1 / p.51 ex.3
The Present Tense (regular verbs) p.43 (p.168-169) p.50 ex.2
Talking about events in the past p.46 (p.168-169)
Plurals p.48
Saying there is/are or there isn’t/aren’t p.76 (p.167) p.86 ex.1
Using on peut (we can) + infinitive (full verb) p.79 (p.168)
Position of adjectives p.77 (p.166)
Saying ‘to the’ or ‘at the’ p.78 (p.167) p.86 ex.2
Partitive articles (some – du/de la/de l’/des) p.58 (p.166) p.68 ex.1
Manger (to eat) et Boire (to drink) p.50 (p.168-169)
Regular –ER verbs p.68 ex.2
Negative Forms p.60 (p.167) p.68 ex.3
Pouvoir (to be able to) p.61 (p.168-169)
Je voudrais (+noun/verb) p.63 p.69 ex.4
Aimer (+infinitive = full verb) p.69 ex.4
Il faut + infinitive = full verb (you need/must have)

Skills

During the exam, there will be a reading section and a translation (French-English) section covering the above topics, as well as an extended writing task.

Structure your revision

  1. Learn vocabulary for each of the topics above by following these techniques
  • Quizlet
  • Create flashcards and ask someone to test you
  • Put post-it notes around your room of difficult vocabulary that is not sticking
  1. Complete practise reading exercises
  • Look over and complete reading texts from your text book linked to the above topics (Units 1-5)
  • Complete Extra Star/Plus activities on p.16,17, 34, 35, 70, 71, 88, 89
  • Practise translating the texts into English

The writing paper will be assessed using the following criteria:-

Content Range of language Accuracy
  • Full coverage of bullet points.
  • Consistently goes beyond minimum, introducing detail and interest.
  • Communication is clear and unambiguous.
  • Very wide range of familiar and unfamiliar vocabulary and expression and little repetition.
  • Very wide range of grammatical structures which add interest and variety.
  • Use of more than one time frame.
  • High level of accuracy.
  • Some errors in more complex sentences.
  • Verbs, tense formations and time frames secure.

To achieve a Grade 3, you need to accomplish the following in your writing:-

  • I can respond to questions on a familiar topic
  • I can communicate simple responses with some clarity
  • I can develop some longer sentences, using a few connectives
  • I can write simple opinions and can sometimes give reasons for these
  • I can write with some range of appropriate vocabulary on a familiar topic
  • I can refer to two different time frames with some success
  • I am working to improve my accuracy, though may still make a number of errors
  • I can recognise some patterns in verbs am working on my ability to adapt regular verbs and some common irregular verbs according to who is doing the action
  • I can develop longer sentences, using a few connectives
  • I am working on improving my grammar and spelling
  • I can use a dictionary to look up words and check spellings
  • I can recognise some simple patterns in language and can use this knowledge when forming tenses and checking accuracy such as gender

Download Here : Year 7 End of year revision guide French

Design Technology

Think about how you designed your Key Fob & Mobile Phone Holder this year.

For this exam, you will also be asked to design product.

  1. What are ‘Initial Ideas’ and how do I record these?
  2. How did I ‘Develop’ My chosen Ideas this year?
  3. How should I present my ideas through sketching ?
  4. How should I annotate my sketches?
  5. How did I laminate some plywood for my mobile phone holder?
  6. Further questions :
    1. What tools and machinery did I use to make my mobile phone holder?
    2. What safety precautions did I need to take?

Download Here : Year 7 Exam Guidance DT

Geography

The Year 7 Geography Examination will last 45 minutes and review all the topics covered this year.  It will be held on Friday 25th May.

Use the guide below to structure your revision and identify the areas in which you need to focus.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help!

What is Geography?

Topic to revise Happy with understanding Needs further revision Need to ask for help
What is Geography?
What is Human / Physical Geography?

Rivers and Mapwork

Topic to revise Happy with understanding Needs further revision Need to ask for help
What is the Water Cycle?
What are the different ways in which water reaches a river?
What is the long profile of a river?
How does a river change as we move down the Long Profile?
What is a Drainage Basin? What are the different parts of a Drainage Basin?
How does a river Erode and Transport material?
How do Waterfalls, ‘V’ shaped valleys, Meanders and Ox-Bow Lakes form?
How are contours used to show relief?
How are map symbols used?
Be able to give and read 4 and 6 figure grid references in order to locate objects
Be able to give and read directions on a map to locate features
Be able to give both curved and straight line distances on a map

The British Isles

Topic to revise Happy with understanding Needs further revision Need to ask for help
Be able to name and locate the main Physical features of the UK (Mountains and Rivers)
Be able to recognise, name and locate the different nations that make up the British Isles / UK
What is Weather? Climate?
How does climate vary across the British Isles?
Be able to explain Relief Rainfall
How / why has the population of the British Isles grown?
What is the population distribution of the British Isles?

Africa

Topic to revise Happy with understanding Needs further revision Need to ask for help
What is a Continent? Be able to name / locate the continents
Be able to locate / name the key Physical features of Africa
Be able to locate / name certain named countries in Africa
What is a Biome?
Be able to name and describe the Biomes of Africa

Download Here : Year 7 Geography Examination Revision Checklist

Physics

Activate Physics is an excellent source of information. It is available as a digital book on www.kerboodle.com  . The learning objectives on each double page spread will help you check your understanding of the following topics:

Forces (p14 – 25)
Topics Pages
What do forces do? 14, 15
Names of forces 14 - 25
Interaction pairs 14, 15
Squashing and stretching 16, 17
Friction 18, 19
Weight 21
Equilibrium 22
Balanced and unbalanced forces 22, 23

Sound (p26 – 37)
Wave features 26, 27
Describing sound (including similarities and differences with light) 28, 29
Loudness 30, 31
Detecting sound 32, 33

Light (p38 – 49)
Describing light (including similarities and differences with sound) 38, 39
Light years 39
Reflection 40, 41
The eye 44, 45
Colour 46, 47

Space (p50 - 55)
Objects in the Universe 50, 51
The Earth 54, 55

Working Scientifically (p2 – 11)
Asking scientific questions 2, 3
Variables 2, 3

Download Here : Year 7 Physics Revision List

Maths
History

Year 7 Revision Topics

Topic Textbook Key issues to revise
The Norman Conquest Pages 2-7 Main claimants in 1066

Events leading to the Battle of Stamford Bridge

Reasons for Norman victory in Battle of Hastings

 

Conquered England Pages 8-11 Key features of the Feudal system

Opposition to the Norman Conquest

Reasons for the Domesday Book and details collected

Key features of life in the Medieval Period

 

Life in the Middle Ages Pages 33-37 Reasons for building castles and types of castles

Methods of attacking and defending a castle

Medieval Health and the Black Death, beliefs about causes, treatments and consequences of Britain.

 


End of Year exam structure:

Section A: (10 mins) Section B (10 mins) Section C (25 mins)
Knowledge recall

 

Students to answer 10 factual knowledge questions based on the topics studied.

A written or visual source.

 

Students to identify the main argument of the source and support with specific examples from the source, contextual knowledge and provenance.

An extended writing question.

 

Students to write a clearly structured analysis of the causes of an event they have studied.  This will include assessment of literacy skills and the ability to write in a structured and grammatically accurate fashion.

 

  • Section A will include a series of short answer factual knowledge questions on the topics listed above. Some will be simple factual recall and others may require a definition or simple explanation of a time.
  • Section B will take the format of a single 6 mark question. Students will need to comment on the content and provenance of a source and link it to their contextual knowledge of the period.  g. Source A is critical of William the Conqueror.  How do you know?
  • Section C will take the following question format and will be worth 9 marks. The question will be phrased as ‘Write an account of the reasons for X’

This question requires students to explain the causes of an event recognising a series of events in chronological order and the connections between the events to show how long-term causes laid the foundations for short-term events.

Religion AG

What is God like?

Area  
1)    What do Christians believe that God is like and why? (Trinity)    
2)    What do Hindus believe that God is like? (Focus on Ganesh)    
3)    What do Muslims believe that God is like? (99 Names)    
4)    Different ways that God has been represented by different faiths and cultures and why (images of God)    

What makes humans unique?

Area
1)    What is the soul? (Dualist & Monist views)    
2)    What do Buddhists believe about the soul (there is no permanent self – Chariot analogy)    
3)    Ultimate questions    
4)    Human Rights    

Authority and Hijab (Islam)

Area  
1)    What is authority? Who has authority over us?    
2)    Where does the authority come from in Islam?    
3)    What is Hijab and how is it worn in different places?    
4)    What does the Qur’an say about covering up?    
5)    Should the Muslim veil be banned? (Reasons on both sides)    
Religion NH

What is God like?

Area
1)    What do Christians believe that God is like and why? (Trinity)    
2)    What do Hindus believe that God is like? (Focus on Ganesh)
3)    What do Muslims believe that God is like? (99 Names)
4)    Different ways that God has been represented by different faiths and cultures and why (images of God)

 

What makes humans unique?

Area
1)    Facts about the human body & what makes up a person    
2)    What is the soul? (Different views from Bart sells his soul)
3)    What do Buddhists believe about the soul (there is no permanent self – Chariot analogy)
4)    Ultimate questions
5)    Human Rights

 

Symbolism and the Hajj (Islam)

Area
1)    What is a symbol? (use examples)    
2)    What is the Hajj and why do people go? (outline 5 pillars)
3)    What happens at each stage of the hajj?
4)    What is the symbolism and/or historical reason why these actions are performed?
5)    How do Muslims feel post-hajj?

 

Authority and Hijab (Islam)

Area
1)    What is authority? Who has authority over us?    
2)    Where does the authority come from in Islam?
3)    What is Hijab and how is it worn in different places?
4)    What does the Qur’an say about covering up?
5)    Should the Muslim veil (niqab) be banned? (Reasons on both sides)
English

In addition to the Essential Grammar Knowledge, you should revise the Key Knowledge identified below; this Key Knowledge relates to each of the topics you have studied so far this year. If you are unsure about any of this material, please check your exercise book and class notes first, and then ask your teacher.  The End of Year Exam will consist of short questions, designed to test your understanding of the Key Knowledge that we want you to take into next year and beyond.


Year Group:  7

Term:  Autumn 1

Title of SOL:  Narrative and Descriptive writing, including non-fiction descriptive.

Key knowledge/concepts:

Narrative structure (e.g. Freytag’s pyramid or Todorov’s five stages); characterisation; setting; imagery; sensory description; first person narrative; third person narrative; direct speech; indirect or reported speech

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

Punctuating speech; pronouns; word classes and sentence types from Essential Grammar Knowledge; narrator; protagonist; tension/suspense; fiction; non-fiction; Standard English


Year Group:  7

Term:  Autumn 2

Title of SOL:  Legends, Fables, Fairy Tales and Parables

Key knowledge/concepts:

- Oral tradition

- Fables: usually short; can be in verse or prose; often includes anthropomorphised animals or natural forces; lead to a moral sometimes expressed in a maxim.

- Legends: must include discussion of at least one Jersey legend; a traditional narrative that relates to the history and values of a community; focuses on human beings, not supernatural forces, but may include miracles

- Fairy tales: Include folkloric characters (e.g. dragons, witches, elves); feature magic and enchantment; might not have an overt moral; might start with ‘once upon a time’ or ‘a long time ago’

- Parables: a short didactic story (giving a moral) that differs from fables in focusing exclusively on human vs anthropomorphised characters; the term can be applied to parables of Jesus e.g. Good Samaritan, Prodigal Son


Year Group:  7

Term:  Spring 1

Title of SOL:  Shakespeare

Key knowledge/concepts:

Dramatic irony; tension; pivotal moment; foreshadowing; audience; conventions of genre: comedy and/or tragedy;

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

In addition to the concepts above, language terms: imagery; metre: iambic pentameter; characterisation; soliloquy; aside.


Year Group:  7

Term: Summer 1

Title of SOL: Empathy

Key knowledge/concepts:

When reading:

Characterisation: major characters, minor characters, foil, protagonist, antagonist.

Plot: Narrative structure and perspective with a focus on ‘turning points’ in narrative.

When writing:

The idea of details (e.g. facts, figures, names) and developments (e.g. implications, emotional responses),

Voice; Tone


Year Group:  7

Term: Spring 2

Title of SOL: Poetry and Art (to include poems from Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience)

Key knowledge/concepts:

Concept of a pattern of imagery (e.g. natural imagery, religious imagery)

Concept of theme (explored across multiple poems and images)

For Blake (themes and context): Innocence, Experience, The French Revolution, Freedom, Religion, Poverty

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

Terminology for poetry: repetition, metaphor, tone, adjective, verb, alliteration, monosyllabic/polysyllabic words, enjambment, caesura

Terminology for analysis: implies, connotation, suggests, effect


Literacy at JCG: Grammar Knowledge Complex sentence A sentence containing a dependent clause or clauses e.g. ‘Although Mary went home, John stayed at the party’. (Notice the commas).

Common Noun A word that is used to identify a class of people, places or things e.g. children, countryside, chairs. Fragments (can be used deliberately but often an error) Sentences that do not contain an independent clause e.g. ‘Late afternoon. She was clearly running late.’

Proper Noun A word use to name a particular people, place or thing e.g. Susan, Jersey, Nimbus3000. Coordinating Conjunctions A conjunction placed between clauses of equal importance (such as two independent clauses): For, And, But, Or, Yet, So (Remember: FANBOYS).

Pronoun A word that can replace a noun: I, You, He, She, It, They, Them, We. Subordinating Conjunctions A conjunction used to link dependent and independent clause to establish a time, place, reason, condition, concession or a comparison for the main clause: As, Because, Although, Though, Even Though, Whereas, If.

Adjective A word that is used to modify a noun e.g. ‘The tall teacher talked to the class.’ Comma – Lists , Used to separate items in a list.

Comparative adjective An adjective that is used to compare two people or things e.g. ‘The teacher is taller than me.’ Comma – separating Dependent and Independent Clauses , Used to separate dependent clauses from independent clauses (see examples above).

Superlative adjective An adjective that is used to compare one person or thing to every other member of a group of people or things e.g. ‘The teacher is the tallest person in the classroom.’ Comma – in a compound sentence , Used before a coordinating conjunction that joins two independent clauses

Verb A word used to describe an action, state or occurrence e.g. hear, become, happen. Comma Splices (an error to avoid) Two or more independent clauses separated by a comma.

Adverb A word that is used to modify a verb e.g. ‘He ran quickly.’ Speech marks “ Used to indicate that words are dialogue e.g. “This is excellent work”, said the teacher.

Sentence A group of words that is complete in itself (that makes sense). Quotation marks ‘ Used to indicate that words are quoted from a text e.g. In the first stanza, the poet uses the phrase ‘my love’.

Subject The person, place or thing that is carrying out an action or being something e.g. ‘The boy shouted loudly’ or ‘The boy is scared’. Semi-Colon ; Used to join two related independent clauses.

Object The person, place or thing that is having an action done to it e.g. ‘The boy shouted loudly into the megaphone.’ Colon : Used to precede lists, expansions or explanations. Also used for emphasis.

Independent Clause or

Main Clause

A clause that can stand alone as a sentence (because it makes sense on its own) e.g. ‘The cat sat on the mat’. Apostrophe – Possessive ‘ Used to indicate ownership.

Dependent Clause or

Subordinate Clause

A clause that depends on an independent clause to make sense e.g. ‘Without turning around, the cat sat on the mat’. Apostrophe – Omission ‘ Used to indicate a missing letter.

Embedded Clause A dependent clause that is embedded within an independent clause e.g. ‘The man, who appeared from nowhere, sat next to the cat’. (Notice the commas). Preposition of Time A word that indicates when something happens in time e.g. ‘During lesson one, the fire alarm rang.’

Simple sentence A sentence consisting of only one clause, with a single subject and predicate (a predicate is the part of a sentence that contains a verb, and says something about the subject). Preposition of Place A word that indicates where something happens in place e.g. ‘A fire broke out in Room 51.’

Compound sentence A sentence with more than one subject or predicate e.g. ‘John went home but Mary stayed at the party’ (here, two independent clauses are joined by a co-ordinating conjunction) The passive voice A grammatical construction in which the noun or noun phrase that would normally be the subject of the sentence becomes the object e.g. ‘The ball was kicked’.

Spelling = See the 15 Spelling Strategies in your Planner

Year 7 Key Knowledge Retrieval Practice
0.4132744 What does caesura mean?
0.11923045 What does it mean to describe part of a narrative as a 'turning point'?
0.41094441 What is a complex sentnece?
0.02630004 What is a maxim?
0.85399922 What is an antagonist?
0.00804226 What is the difference between ficton and non-fiction?
0.53037658 What does it mean if a character in a play speaks a line 'aside'?
0.56276655 Identify three ways in writers can create/shape character?
0.64873472 What does dramatic irony mean?
0.12826785 What did Blake mean by innocence and experience?
0.18763116 What is a monosyllabic word?
0.53605851 For what purpose do we use a semi-colon?
0.78289257 What are some of the features of a Shakespearean comedy OR tragedy?
0.73552676 What is a dependent or subordinate clause?
0.46634761 Name two of the parables of Jesus
0.06227647 During' is a preposition of…?
0.88528683 What name do we give to the person/voice telling a story?
0.33754095 Legends focus on human beings, rather than what?
0.41880757 What historic event began in Europe in 1789?
0.22170775 Give two rules for punctuating speech/dialogue.
0.42116579 What does enjambment mean?
0.94607795 What is the difference between direct and indirect/reported speech?
0.50224567 What does anthropomorphism mean?
0.92061232 What is meant by first person narrative?
0.23176783 Name the stages/parts of narrative you have learnt.
0.95130318 What is a soliloquy?
0.07503267 When completing empathic/empathetic writing, what sort of things count as 'details' in a text?
0.8001697 Give two examples of types of imagery (or figurative language).
0.95973867 What is the title of a local (Jersey) legend?
0.51811633 What does didactic mean?
0.00484376 What is a noun?
0.58981045 Give two exmaples of folkloric characters
0.75877409 What is a protagonist?
0.84151857 Give an example of a pivotal moment from the Shakespeare text you studied
0.49759488 What do we mean by the term 'a pattern of imagery'?
0.33045443 What is iambic pentameter?
Drama

For this exam you are creating a scene based on a fairy story. You must modernise this piece and include some or all of the techniques that you have learnt so far, such as freezes, tableaux, gazers, bones, use of narration, slow motion and creation of a character.

You will work in small groups of 4/5 and as part of the task you must work well in class and arrange short rehearsals at lunch to ensure the piece is ready for the exam week deadline.

The piece must be 4-5 minutes in length.

Some suggestions are listed below:

Rumpelstiltskin

Beauty and the Beast

Sleeping Beauty

Hansel and Gretel

The Gingerbread Man

Little Red Riding Hood

Billy Goats Gruff

Goldilocks and the Three Bears

The Three Little Pigs

You may choose your own fairy story if you wish. Just ensure that there are not too many characters in the story as you are working in small groups.

We would like you to costume these pieces, but please do not go out and buy lavish costumes. Masks or hats would be enough. For the exam we do not want you in PE kit though. This is part of your exam so please take it seriously and in preparation time discuss what you will need to find with your group.

Lines must be learnt as part of the task.

The play will be examined during exam week (week of the 21st May).

You will be given a curriculum level (1-9) for this work, which will be entered on your report.

Good luck and work hard.

CD/DH​


Year 8 Revision Lists

French

What to revise for the end of year assessment?

You will be tested on the following topics:

TOPIC VOCABULARY LIST
(Allez 1 and 2)
Holidays Allez 1 – Unit 7 – p.129
French culture & work Allez 2 – Unit 1 p.21
Film/TV Allez 2 – Unit 2 p.39
Past (le passé composé – perfect tense) Prssent (le présent) & Future (le futur proche – near future) Tenses Allez 1 – Grammar Section – p.168-170

Skills

During the exam, there will be a reading and writing section as well as a translation (French-English) section covering the above topics. 


Grammar

Log in to Kerboodle and go to the digital book – Allez 1&2

GRAMMAR ALLEZ 1 Extra Practice
Present tense v’s Perfect tense (past) p.141
Perfect tense (past) with Être and verbs of motion p.152 (p.121/168-169) p.153 ex 3
Different tenses p.155 p.154 ex 3 / p.155 ex 4 / p.161 ex 4
Expressions with Avoir p.157
Holidays
Finir / Choisir verbs p.112 (p.168-169) p.122 ex 1
Prendre verb p.115
Near Future tense (going to) p.115 (p.168-169) p.115 ex.5
Je voudrais/J’aimerais p.116 p.117 ex 4
Perfect tense (past tense) with avoir p.118 p.118 ex 1 / p.119 ex 3 / p.122 ex.2
Translation Practice p.125 ex.2+4
French culture & work ALLEZ 2
Present tense of –er verbs p.5 P.14, exc 1
Comparisons p.7/167 P.14, exc 2
Perfect tense with AVOIR P.8 P.15, exc 4
Qui p.12
Film/TV  
Direct object pronouns P.22 p.32, exc 1
Faire + infinitive P.24
Ce que P.25 p.32, exc 2
Opinions in the past P.26
Verbs followed by an infinitive P.29

Structure your revision

  1. Learn vocabulary for each of the topics above by following these techniques
  • Quizlet
  • Create flashcards and ask someone to test you
  • Put post-it notes around your room of difficult vocabulary that is not sticking
  1. Complete practise reading exercises
  • Look over and complete reading texts from your text book linked to the above topics Allez 1 (Unit 7) & Allez 2 (Units 1-2)
  • Complete Extra Star/Plus activities
  • Practise translating the texts into English
  1. Revise past and future tenses
  • Learn phrases in the past and future tense under the topic of town
  • Use languagesonline.org.uk to revise understanding

The writing paper will be assessed using the following criteria:-

Content Range of language Accuracy
  • Full coverage of bullet points.
  • goes beyond minimum, introducing detail and interest.
  • Communication is clear and unambiguous.
  • Very wide range of familiar and unfamiliar vocabulary and expression and little repetition.
  • Very wide range of grammatical structures which add interest and variety.
  • Use of more than one time frame.
  • High level of accuracy.
  • Some errors in more complex sentences.
  • Verbs, tense formations and time frames secure.

To achieve a Grade 4, you need to accomplish the following in your writing:-

  • I can respond to most questions and I am working to improve my ability to convey my intended meaning with clarity
  • I can develop some longer sentences, using some connectives
  • I can convey a reasonable amount of information
  • I can express, and sometimes explain, simple opinions
  • I can write with a variety of appropriate vocabulary
  • I can communicate in at least two different time frames or more, mostly with success
  • I am working to improve my accuracy, though may still make a number of minor and some major errors

 

Italian

Your end of year exam will have three questions:

  • A photo description task , where you will need to write four sentences describing the photo
  • A writing task of around 40 words
  • Five short translation sentences

You should revise the following things:

  • The weather
  • Free time
  • Talking about yourself
  • Street directions
  • Describing people in photos
  • Giving opinions and justifying them
  • Present tense
  • Simple future tense (vado a mangiare / giocare / guardare etc = I’m going to eat/play/watch etc)

ALL REVISION WORK CARRIED OUT IN CLASS THIS TERM/ FOR HOMEWORK WILL BE VERY USEFUL FOR THIS ASSESSMENT.

Design Technology

For this exam, you will be asked to design a product.

Think about how you designed and made your projects this year.

Designing a Product

  1. What are ‘Initial Ideas’ and how do I record these?
  2. How did I ‘Develop’ my chosen Ideas this year?
  3. How should I present my ideas through sketching?
  4. How should I annotate my sketches?

My DT Projects in Year 8

  1. How did I make my Copper Tea Light Holder and what did I learn?
  2. What tools equipment and materials did I use?
Physics

Activate Physics is an excellent source of information. It is available as a digital book on www.kerboodle.com  . The learning objectives on each double page spread will help you check your understanding of the following topics:

Electricity And Magnetism (p62 – 79)
Topics Pages
Charging up 62, 63
Circuits and current 64, 65
Potential difference 66, 67
Series and parallel 68, 69
Resistance 70, 71
Magnets and magnetic fields 72, 73
Electromagnets 74, 75

Energy (p80 – 97)
Types of energy (energy stores and transfers) 82, 83
Energy resources 90, 91

Motion and Pressure (p98 – 113)
Pressure in liquids 104, 105
Pressure on solids 106, 107
Turning forces 108, 109

Working Scientifically (p2 – 11)
Asking scientific questions 2, 3
Variables 2, 3

Download Here : Year 8 Physics Revision List

Spanish

The test will be include a grammar task, a reading activity and a writing piece and will take 45 minutes. You will take your test in your SPANISH groups (not in teaching groups like some other subjects).

All of the topics included have been covered this year and are in your textbook Units 1, 2 and 3.

Ensure you go over the vocabulary for each section and complete any resumen and prepárate activities. You should also revisit your notes and completed tasks from lessons and homework.

In order to prepare you should revise the following specific topics:

  • family members and animals;
  • the verbs TENER and SER;
  • correct use of adjectives;
  • personal details – how to say your name, age, your physical description;,
  • information about two school subjects and your opinion;
  • description of a family member and opinion;
Chemistry
Food and Nutrition

This year you will be completing an online multiple choice question exam paper for your summative assessment. Using the completed worksheets notes in your Food & Nutrition folder, and your ‘Healthy Lunch’ project, please start to revise the following topics in preparation for your end of Yr 8 test.

  • Rules for Health & Safety in the Food Room
  • Food Hygiene- know how to avoid cross-contamination and able to explain high risk Foods
  • Proteins, Fats and Carbohydrates- make sure you know which foods contain these nutrients and what the role of these nutrients is in your diet.
  • Know the role of vitamins A, C and E in our diet.
  • Know the 8 Tips for Healthy Eating
  • Be able to explain the Eatwell Plate and the nutrients contained in each section- know how many portions we should ideally eat from each section daily.
  • Know the advantages and disadvantages of using electrical equipment in food preparation.
  • Be able to suggest ways we can cut down on fat, salt and sugar in recipes.
  • Be able to suggest ways to shop economically.
  • Know the benefits of using local produce.
Maths
Religion AG

Truth

1)    What are the 4 types of truth?    
2)    What is the difference between a fundamentalist, liberal and atheist view?
3)    How can different people find different types of truth in religious stories? (e.g. Creation Stories, the story of Noah’s Ark)

Faith into Action

1)    What is worship?
2)    How do believers express their worship?
3)    Where and how do Christians worship? (e.g. holy communion, bible reading, charity organisations etc.)
4)    How do Muslims worship? (e.g. the five pillars of Islam, Salat etc.)

Private Study

1)    What do two religions belief about God or life after death?    
2)    How do two religions celebrate either a birth, marriage or death ceremony? (why do they celebrate it like this?)
3)    How do two religions go about answering ultimate questions? (e.g. how did the universe begin? What is our purpose in life? What happens when we die?)

What happens when we die?

1)    Is there evidence of life after death? (e.g. near death experiences, reincarnation)    
2)    What do Christians believe in life after death?
3)    What do Muslims believe in life after death?
4)    What do Sikhs believe in life after death?
5)    What do Buddhists believe in life after death?

 

Religion SL

These are the revision topics for your exam:

  • People we admire
  • The Life of the Buddha
  • The Four Noble Truths
  • The Eightfold Path

Remember the exam will test knowledge, understanding and evaluation.

There will be short questions to test your knowledge on the topics above and and a stimulus question with some material for you to read and then write a longer answer about. You cannot revise for this question - but it will be around the topics we have been thinking about in class. Read the question carefully and follow the instructions.

Drama

For this exam you are staging a scene from the musical Bugsy Malone. You must polish this piece well and include some choreography either as a routine or for transitions between one part of your extract and the next.  Consider including some the techniques that you have learnt so far, such as tableaux, slow motion and obviously the creation of a character.

You will work in small groups of between 4 and 9. As part of the task you must work well in class and arrange short rehearsals at lunch to ensure the piece is ready for the exam week deadline.

We would like you to costume these pieces as best you can. We have hats, boas etc to add a sense of period to the piece. For the exam we do not want you in PE kit. This is part of your exam so please take it seriously and in preparation time discuss what you will need to find with your group. The same applies to props. We have bits and pieces here if you are stuck. Create a list of props and we will tell you what we have and what you will need to find.

Lines must be learnt as part of the task.

The play will be examined during exam week (week of the 21st May).

You will be given a curriculum level (1-9) for this work, which will be entered on your report.

Good luck and work hard.

CD/DH​

Geography

Water and rivers

I can …

Label a diagram of the hydrological cycle.
Label a diagram of a drainage basin.
Draw and label a storm hydrograph.
Explain how a storm hydrograph works.
Explain which factors increase flood risk.
Explain which factors decrease flood risk.
Describe and explain the consequences of river flooding.
Define the four main forms of river erosion.
Define the four main forms of river transportation.
Define river deposition.
Draw and explain the Bradshaw model.

Development and trade

I can …

Define development.
Name measures of development and describe how they can be used to measure development.
Draw the Brandt line.
Explain the advantages and disadvantages of using the Brandt line.
Explain the physical factors influencing development.
Explain the human factors influencing development.
Define “trade”, “trade surplus”, and “trade deficit”.
Explain how Fair Trade works.
English

In addition to the Essential Grammar Knowledge, you should revise the Key Knowledge identified below; this Key Knowledge relates to each of the topics you have studied so far this year. If you are unsure about any of this material, please check your exercise book and class notes first, and then ask your teacher.  The End of Year Exam will consist of short questions, designed to test your understanding of the Key Knowledge that we want you to take into next year and beyond.


Year Group: 8

Term:  Autumn 1

Title of SOL: Poetry: Narrative Poetry through the Ages (including ballads

Key knowledge/concepts:

PEA Analysis; typicality (e.g. Romanticism / Gothic); form; ballad; epic; structure; narrative poetry; voice/tone; metre

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

Terminology: repetition, metaphor, tone, adjective, verb, alliteration, monosyllabic and polysyllabic words, enjambment, caesura.


Year Group: 8

Term: Autumn 2

Title of SOL:  Transformation writing in response to a prose text

Key knowledge/concepts:

Characterisation: major characters, minor characters, foil, protagonist, antagonist.

Plot: Narrative structure (e.g. Freytag’s pyramid or Todorov’s five stages) and  ‘turning points’ in narrative.

Techniques: tone (build vocabulary of tone words), register, theme, symbol, motif, narrative perspective, direct speech, reported or indirect speech, free indirect style.


Year Group: 8

Term: Spring 1

Title of SOL:  Year 8 Travel Writing

Key knowledge/concepts:

Explicit knowledge of a range of persuasive devices (e.g. rhetorical questions, appeal to statistics or expert authority, use of anecdote). Explicit knowledge of a range of devices for creating vivid description (e.g. adjectives and verbs, repetition, sensory imagery, onomatopoeia, metaphor and simile). The concepts of audience and purpose, and how to apply these to texts. The concept of tone and a range of words for describing tone.


Year Group: 8

Term: Spring 2

Title of SOL:  The Gothic Tradition

Key knowledge/concepts:

Conventions of Gothic literature ( including horror, terror, suspense, typical settings such as gloomy castles, supernatural elements, non-human figures and ‘monsters’)

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

In addition to the concepts above: foreshadowing, epistolary novel


Year Group: 8

Term: Summer (1 and 2)

Title of SOL: The Shakespeare Festival

Key knowledge/concepts:

Iambic pentameter and blank verse; soliloquy; aside; stage directions (often put in the dialogue by Shakespeare); protagonist; minor character; genre (including conventions of tragedy and / or comedy); imagery (with attention to specific patterns of imagery in the chosen play); characterisation and character development; characters as vehicles for exploring themes; the Elizabethan/Jacobean theatre (physical features of playhouses and theatres as places where different social ranks mixed; theatres could be seen as subversive of moral/political order, whilst also sometimes claiming to support these things)


Literacy at JCG: Grammar Knowledge Complex sentence A sentence containing a dependent clause or clauses e.g. ‘Although Mary went home, John stayed at the party’. (Notice the commas).

Common Noun A word that is used to identify a class of people, places or things e.g. children, countryside, chairs. Fragments (can be used deliberately but often an error) Sentences that do not contain an independent clause e.g. ‘Late afternoon. She was clearly running late.’

Proper Noun A word use to name a particular people, place or thing e.g. Susan, Jersey, Nimbus3000. Coordinating Conjunctions A conjunction placed between clauses of equal importance (such as two independent clauses): For, And, But, Or, Yet, So (Remember: FANBOYS).

Pronoun A word that can replace a noun: I, You, He, She, It, They, Them, We. Subordinating Conjunctions A conjunction used to link dependent and independent clause to establish a time, place, reason, condition, concession or a comparison for the main clause: As, Because, Although, Though, Even Though, Whereas, If.

Adjective A word that is used to modify a noun e.g. ‘The tall teacher talked to the class.’ Comma – Lists , Used to separate items in a list.

Comparative adjective An adjective that is used to compare two people or things e.g. ‘The teacher is taller than me.’ Comma – separating Dependent and Independent Clauses , Used to separate dependent clauses from independent clauses (see examples above).

Superlative adjective An adjective that is used to compare one person or thing to every other member of a group of people or things e.g. ‘The teacher is the tallest person in the classroom.’ Comma – in a compound sentence , Used before a coordinating conjunction that joins two independent clauses

Verb A word used to describe an action, state or occurrence e.g. hear, become, happen. Comma Splices (an error to avoid) Two or more independent clauses separated by a comma.

Adverb A word that is used to modify a verb e.g. ‘He ran quickly.’ Speech marks “ Used to indicate that words are dialogue e.g. “This is excellent work”, said the teacher.

Sentence A group of words that is complete in itself (that makes sense). Quotation marks ‘ Used to indicate that words are quoted from a text e.g. In the first stanza, the poet uses the phrase ‘my love’.

Subject The person, place or thing that is carrying out an action or being something e.g. ‘The boy shouted loudly’ or ‘The boy is scared’. Semi-Colon ; Used to join two related independent clauses.

Object The person, place or thing that is having an action done to it e.g. ‘The boy shouted loudly into the megaphone.’ Colon : Used to precede lists, expansions or explanations. Also used for emphasis.

Independent Clause or

Main Clause

A clause that can stand alone as a sentence (because it makes sense on its own) e.g. ‘The cat sat on the mat’. Apostrophe – Possessive ‘ Used to indicate ownership.

Dependent Clause or

Subordinate Clause

A clause that depends on an independent clause to make sense e.g. ‘Without turning around, the cat sat on the mat’. Apostrophe – Omission ‘ Used to indicate a missing letter.

Embedded Clause A dependent clause that is embedded within an independent clause e.g. ‘The man, who appeared from nowhere, sat next to the cat’. (Notice the commas). Preposition of Time A word that indicates when something happens in time e.g. ‘During lesson one, the fire alarm rang.’

Simple sentence A sentence consisting of only one clause, with a single subject and predicate (a predicate is the part of a sentence that contains a verb, and says something about the subject). Preposition of Place A word that indicates where something happens in place e.g. ‘A fire broke out in Room 51.’

Compound sentence A sentence with more than one subject or predicate e.g. ‘John went home but Mary stayed at the party’ (here, two independent clauses are joined by a co-ordinating conjunction) The passive voice A grammatical construction in which the noun or noun phrase that would normally be the subject of the sentence becomes the object e.g. ‘The ball was kicked’.

Spelling = See the 15 Spelling Strategies in your Planner

Year 8 Key Knowledge Retrieval Practice
0.734777865 What is a ballad?
0.438333777 Give an example of an epic poem.
0.033265046 What is meant by the term narrative poetry?
0.190570567 What does 'tone' refer to in relation to poetry?
0.130638554 What is enjambment?
0.718108502 What is caesura?
0.092375174 Descrbe two typical features of Gothic or Romantic poetry
0.131570872 What is meant by the term apostrophe of omission?
0.913047154 What are monosyllabic words?
0.627847124 What does connotation mean?
0.239986971 What is a foil?
0.070492843 What does protagonist mean?
0.85239481 What does antagonist mean?
0.023133236 Name the stages/parts of narrative you have learnt.
0.907573033 What is meant by a narrative 'turning point'?
0.256203568 What does register mean?
0.792782819 What is a motif?
0.182178047 What is meant by narrative perspective?
0.563733773 What is the difference between direct and indirect/reported speech?
0.13381736 What is free indirect style?
0.867824313 List three persuasive devices
0.707272891 What is meant by onomatopoeia?
0.194634909 What do we mean by the purpose of a text? Give an example
0.843990538 What do we mean by the tone of a text?
0.639931832 What is an independent or main clause?
0.084486739 What is a complex sentence?
0.078540404 Semi-colons can be used to join two…what?
0.477619507 Where might a Gothic story typically be set?
0.280932997 Name two typical features (other than setting) of Gothic fiction?
0.505052702 What does foreshadowing mean?
0.208644442 What is epistolary fiction?
0.222301731 What is blank verse?
0.182942854 What is a soliloquy?
0.309763872 Identify two key features of the Elizabethan/Jacobean theatre.
0.617034071 What are some key features of Shakespearean comedy OR tragedy?
0.974801725 What is a noun?
0.365222481 What is a dependent or subordinate clause?
0.457075733 During' is a preposition of…?
0.781128905 For what purpose do we use a semi-colon?
History

Year 8 Revision Topics

Topic Textbook Key issues to revise
Henry VIII Pages 60-67 Henry VIII personality and background

Causes of the English Reformation: Protestantism, The Great Matter, Thomas Cromwell

The Reasons for the Dissolution of the Monasteries

 

Elizabeth I Pages 72-79 Problems Elizabeth faced on coming to the throne

The problem of Mary Queen of Scots and Plots to depose Elizabeth.

War with Spain and reasons for the defeat of the Spanish Armada

 

Causes of the Civil War Pages 87-89 Charles I religious beliefs and background

The impact of the First Bishop’s War

Relationships with parliament – 11 Year Tyranny

Causes and Consequences of the Short and Long Parliaments

Short term causes of the Civil War: Ireland, Grand Remonstrance and Nineteen Propositions.

Reasons why Parliament was victorious in the English Civil War


End of Year exam structure:

Section A: (10 mins) Section B (20 mins) Section C (15 mins)
Knowledge recall

 

Students to answer 10 factual knowledge questions based on the topics studied.

Two written or visual sources.

 

Students to identify the main argument of the source and support with specific examples from the source, contextual knowledge and provenance.

An extended writing question.

 

Students to write a clearly structured analysis of the causes of an event they have studied.  This will include assessment of literacy skills and the ability to write in a structured and grammatically accurate fashion.

 

  • Section A will include a series of short answer factual knowledge questions on the topics listed above. Some will be simple factual recall and others may require a definition or simple explanation of a time.
  • Section B will take the format of a single 12 mark question. Students will need to comment on the content and provenance of two sources and link them to their contextual knowledge of the period.  g. Sources A and B have different views on the Dissolution of the Monasteries.  How do you know and how might these differences be explained.
  • Section C will take the following question format and will be worth 9 marks. The question will be phrased as ‘Write an account of the reasons for X’

This question requires students to explain the causes of an event recognising a series of events in chronological order and the connections between the events to show how long-term causes laid the foundations for short-term events.

 


Year 9 Revision Lists

Italian

Your end of year exam will have three questions:

  1. A photo description task , where you will need to write four sentences describing the photo
  2. A writing task of around 80 words
  3. Five short translation sentences into Italian

You should revise the following things:

  • Free time
  • Describing people in photos
  • Shop vocabulary
  • At the doctor’s vocabulary
  • Talking about holidays
  • Giving opinions and justifying them
  • Present tense
  • Past tense
  • Simple future tense (vado a mangiare / giocare / guardare etc = I’m going to eat/play/watch etc)

ALL REVISION WORK CARRIED OUT IN CLASS THIS TERM/ FOR HOMEWORK WILL BE VERY USEFUL FOR THIS ASSESSMENT.

Physics

The end of Year 9 exam will contain content from “Unit 4: Energy Resources and Energy Transfers” and “Unit 5: Solids, Liquids and Gases”.

Resources can be found on the school network:

Target sheets: S:_Subjects AreaScienceYr 9, 10 and 11 Physics course notes and Past paper questionsYear 9 Target Sheets

Course notes: S:_Subjects AreaScienceYr 9, 10 and 11 Physics course notes and Past paper questionsCourse Notes

Summary booklets: S:_Subjects AreaScienceYr 9, 10 and 11 Physics course notes and Past paper questionsPhysics Summary Booklets

Energy Resources & Energy Transfer
Topics Specification and target sheet reference
Units 4.1
Energy stores & energy transfers 4.2
Conservation of energy 4.3
Efficiency 4.4
Energy transfers & Sankey diagrams 4.5
Convection 4.6, 4.7
Work done 4.11, 4.12
GPE 4.13
Kinetic energy 4.14

Solids, Liquids and Gases
Units 5.1
Density 5.3
Pressure 5.5
Pressure in liquids 5.6, 5.7
Changes of state 5.8, 5.9
States of matter 5.10
Molecules & pressure 5.15
Temperature & molecules 5.18, 5.19

Revision from Years 7 and 8
Directions of forces including weight and drag
Effects of forces
Spanish

The test will be include a grammar task, a writing piece and a translation into Spanish and will take 45 minutes. You will take your test in your SPANISH groups (not in teaching groups like some other subjects).

All of the topics included have been covered this year and are in your textbook Units 5 and 6.

Ensure you go over the vocabulary for each section and complete any resumen and prepárate activities. You should also revisit your notes and completed tasks from lessons and homework.

In order to prepare you should revise the following specific topics:

  1. Use of adjectives
  2. How to tell the time … It is two thirty etc.
  • How to talk about the weather
  1. Talking about where you live
  2. Talking about past activities
  3. Talking about future plans

In order to score top marks in the writing task you must be able to express yourself in present, past and future using a range of vocabulary, expressing opinions and using linking words.

French

What to revise for the end of year assessment?

You will be tested on the following topics:

TOPIC (Allez 2) VOCABULARY LIST
Festivals UNIT 6 p.111
Healthy lifestyles UNIT 5 p.93
Family Relationships / Pocket Money UNIT 4 p.75
Peer pressure UNIT 4 p.75
Past (passé composé = perfect tense or imparfait = imperfect tense) and Future (le futur) tenses GRAMMAR SECTION p.129

 


Log in to Kerboodle and go to the digital book – Allez 2 or use your own copy

 

GRAMMAR ALLEZ 2 Extra Practice
Family Relationships Unit 4 Extra Practice
Expressing opinions, agreeing and disagreeing p.58
Pronouns me, te & se in positive & negative statements p.59 (p.166/168)
Pocket Money
Numbers p.60
Modal Verbs + infinitive (devoir / pouvoir / vouloir) p.61 (p.167/170) p.68 ex.1
Imperfect Tense p.68 ex.2
Family Relationships & Pocket Money Reading Practice p.70 ex.1+2+4 / p.74 ex.3
Healthy living
Impersonal structures p. 76
Pronoun ‘en’ P.78 P.86, exc 1
Perfect tense with AVOIR P.80 P.86, exc 2
Expressions of quantity P.81
Future tense P.82/84 P.169-170, p.87, exc 4
Festivals
Perfect tense with être P.98, 168-170 P.104, exc 1
Perfect or imperfect P.99, 168-170
Near future P.105

 


Skills

During the exam, there will be a reading section and a writing section covering the above topics.


Structure your revision

 

  1. Learn vocabulary for each of the topics above by following these techniques
  • Quizlet
  • Create flashcards and ask someone to test you
  • Put post-it notes around your room of difficult vocabulary that is not sticking

 

  1. Complete practice reading exercises
  • Look over and complete reading texts from your text book linked to the above topics (Units 4-6)
  • Complete the Extra Star/Plus activities at the end of each topic unit
  • Practise translating the texts into English

 

  1. Revise past and future tenses
  • Learn phrases in the past (perfect & imperfect) and future tense under the topic of holidays
  • Use languagesonline.org.uk to revise understanding

 


The writing question will be assessed out of 15 using the following criteria:-

 

Points Content

 

Range of language Accuracy
5
  • Full coverage of bullet points.
  • Consistently goes beyond minimum, introducing detail and interest.
  • Communication is clear and unambiguous.
  • Very wide range of familiar and unfamiliar vocabulary and expression and little repetition.
  • Very wide range of grammatical structures which add interest and variety.
  • Use of more than one time frame.
  • High level of accuracy.
  • Some errors in more complex sentences.
  • Verbs, tense formations and time frames secure.

To achieve a Grade 5, you need to accomplish the following in your writing:-

  • I can convey simple messages without ambiguity
  • I can develop longer sentences, using a range of connectives
  • I can convey a lot of information
  • The intended meaning of my writing is nearly always clear
  • I can express opinions, some of which are explained
  • I can write with a variety of appropriate vocabulary
  • I can communicate in past, present and future time frames, mostly with success
  • Errors are mainly minor, with more serious errors in complex structures and sentences
  • My style and register are appropriate
Food and Nutrition

This year you will be completing an online multiple choice question exam paper for your summative assessment. Using the completed worksheets notes in your Food & Nutrition folder, and your ‘Vitamins & Minerals’ project, please start to revise the following topics in preparation for your end of Yr 9 test.

  • Rules for Health & Safety in the Food Room.
  • Be able to explain the concept of a ‘balanced diet’.
  • Proteins, Fats and Carbohydrates- make sure you know which foods contain these nutrients and what the role of these nutrients is in your diet.
  • Know why we need to have vitamins and minerals in our diet. Revise Vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K. Revise Calcium, Iron, Sodium, Fluoride, Phosphorus and Iodine (You will need to know the functions (job), sources (where we can find them) and the problems associated with not having enough, or having too much, of these vitamins and minerals in our diet.
  • Know the role of fibre and water in our diet.
  • Be able to explain the Eatwell Plate and the nutrients contained in each section- know how many portions we should ideally eat from each section daily.
  • Be able to suggest ways we can cut down on fat, salt and sugar in recipes.
  • Know the benefits of using local produce.
  • Know which illnesses are associated with a high or low intake of certain nutrients.
  • Be able to explain various baking techniques- e.g. ‘rubbing in’, melting and creaming.
  • Be able to suggest nutritious balanced meals for different groups in the population.
  • Revise Coeliac disease, Coronary Heart disease, Vegetarianism, Anaemia and Lactose Intolerance.
Design Technology

Think about what you have learnt this year with the two main projects,

 the Dusk Light & the current Architectural Challenge.

For this exam, you will also be asked to design a product.

Think about how you have designed products over the past three years.

Revision List

Architecture

  • Scale – revise simple scales used to draw products and environments.
  • What are the important considerations for the design of ‘Sheltered Accommodation.
  • What are the architectural design features that can be included for safety and those with physical disabilities .

Task : Revise using lesson notes and project presentation

Designing a product

  • Sketching a range of initial ideas.
  • Why is it necessary to create a range of Initial Ideas?
  • How do you create initial ideas?
  • How do I annotate my ideas?
  • Sketching a final design proposal.
  • What do I need to show in my final design drawing?
  • Construction, size, function etc.

Task : Choose your own household product to design. Sketch a couple of initial ideas before drawing a final design. Annotate the sketch to explain your design.

Electronics

  • Revise the three main sections of the basic ‘Sensing Circuit’ you made.
  • Explain the three sections and where appropriate, give examples.
  • Revise the different types of components you used in your ‘Sensing Circuit’ and what purpose did they serve in the circuit as a whole.

Task : Revise using lesson notes and project presentation

Maths
Chemistry

Revision

Topic CGP Revision guide GCP Workbook Chemistry for you
Basic concepts
1.     States of matter 2 4 19
2.     Movement of particles 3 5 18 and 20-21
3.     Elements compounds and mixtures 8 10 24
4.     Separating techniques 8-11 11-13 27-29
Atomic structure and bonding
5.     Atoms, 6 8 22 and 36-42
6.     Isotopes and relative atomic mass 7 9 44-45
7.     The periodic table and electronic structure 13-15 14-16 112-113 and 130-131
8.     Ionic bonding 16-17 17 76-79
9.     Covalent bonding 18-19 20-21 84-85
Crude oil
10.  Organic compounds 67 Not alcohols, carboxylic acids, esters
68
69
73 -74 (not Q2, 5 and 6) 75
11.  Naming organic compounds
12.  Isomers
13.  Crude oil 70 76 214-216
14.  Cracking 71 77 218
15.  Burning hydrocarbons 72 78-79 217
16.  Carbon dioxide 40 45 339-341
17.  Alkanes 73 80 211
18.  Alkenes 74 81 219

Past Papers

Download Here : Exam 2016 Chemistry

Download Here : Mark scheme 2016 Chemistry

Download Here : Exam 2017 Chemistry

Download Here : Mark scheme 2017 Chemistry

 

History

Shaping the Nation: Britain: Health and the people: c1000 to the present day

Students will study the importance of the following factors:

• war

• superstition and religion

• chance

• government

 

• communication

• science and technology

• the role of the individual in encouraging or inhibiting change.

 

This option focuses on the following questions:

  • Why has there been progress in the health of the British people?
  • How and why has the pace and scale of medical development varied at different times?
  • What impact has medical progress had on people and society?
  • How and why have different factors been more important than others for individual medical

developments?

  • What is the significance of key individuals or events in the history of medical development?

Part one: Medicine stands still

 

Medieval medicine:

·       approaches including natural, supernatural, ideas of Hippocratic and Galenic methods and treatments

·        the medieval doctor

·        training, beliefs about cause of illness.

 Medical progress:

·       the contribution of Christianity to medical progress and treatment;

·       hospitals

·       the nature and importance of Islamic medicine and surgery

·       surgery in medieval times, ideas and techniques.

 

Public health in the Middle Ages:

·       towns and monasteries

·       the Black Death in Britain, beliefs about its causes, treatment and prevention.

Part two: The beginnings of change

 

The impact of the Renaissance on Britain:

·       challenge to medical authority in anatomy, physiology and surgery

·       the work of Vesalius, Paré, William Harvey

·       opposition to change

Dealing with disease:

·       traditional and new methods of treatments

·       quackery

·       methods of treating disease

·        plague

·       the growth of hospitals

·       changes to the training and status of surgeons and physicians

·       the work of John Hunter.

Prevention of disease:

·       inoculation

·       Edward Jenner, vaccination and opposition to change.

Part three: A revolution in medicine

 

The development of Germ Theory and its impact on the treatment of disease in Britain:

·       The importance of Pasteur, Robert Koch and microbe hunting;

·       Pasteur and vaccination;

·        Paul Ehrlich and magic bullets

·       everyday medical treatments and remedies

 

A revolution in surgery:

·       anaesthetics, including Simpson and chloroform

·       antiseptics, including Lister and carbolic acid; surgical procedures

·       aseptic surgery

 

Improvements in public health:

·       public health problems in industrial Britain

·       cholera epidemics

·       the role of public health reformers

·       local and national government involvement in public health improvement, including the 1848 and 1875 Public Health Acts

 


1)How useful is source…?

Source will be written or visual. Students will need to use the content, provenance and their contextual knowledge in order to evaluate the usefulness of the source. It will target a key event, development, individual or group. Useful/Limitations/Provenance [8 marks] 10 mins

2) Explain the significance of...

It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and specifically assesses the concept of significance. Significance looks at the importance of a key event, person/group or development at the time and importance over time. You must reference two aspects of significance such as short term/ long term, correctness, longevity, impact, consequences. [8 marks] 10 mins

3) Essay question using factors; Judgment on relative importance of an event/person against other factors.

Must show balanced explanation and supported evaluation.  It requires knowledge, understanding and analysis of historical events and developments over time. It will ask students to evaluate one stated factor against other factors. Factors could include war, religion, chance, government, communication, science and technology or the role of an individual. This will be an essay question requiring a judgement. It is an extended response which requires you to demonstrate the ability to construct and develop a sustained line of reasoning which is coherent, relevant, substantiated and logically structured. Marks for spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPaG) will also be available. Necessary but not sufficient, however, at face value, enabling, pivotal moment etc. [16 marks] + 4SPaG  25 minutes

Religion AG

Ethics

Area
1)     Ethics Intro (Relative and Absolute ethics. Thinking about ways that moral decisions are made. Christian Values: SoL, VoL and QoL    
2)     Relative Ethics: Utilitarianism (Jeremy Bentham, Act Utilitarianism, Hedonic Calculus, 7 principles).
3)     Relative Ethics: Utiliatrianism (J.S. Mill, Rule Utilitarianism, The Harm Principle, Higher and Lower Pleasures, Strengths and weaknesses of the theory).
4)     Fertility Treatment (What is it? – IVF, AID, AIH, Donor Egg, Surrogacy, Why might it be used? Issues arising)
5)     Absolute Ethics: Kant

(Who was Kant? Absolute Ethics, Universalisaibility, Humans as ends not means, Kingdom of ends, reason, duty, good will)

6)     Absolute Ethics: Kant

(Review, focus on good will, assess the theory, come to a conclusion)

7)     Euthanasia (for and against euthanasia)

Religious Expressions in Society

Area
8)     Religious Art: What does religious expression mean? What makes art ‘religious’? How is religious art used?    
9)     Case Study: Light of the World
10)  How and why is Art used?
Religion NH

Ethics

Area
1)     Ethics Intro (Relative and Absolute ethics. Thinking about ways that moral decisions are made. Religious Ethics and values. SoL, VoL and QoL)    
2)     Relative Ethics: Utilitarianism (Jeremy Bentham, Act Utilitarianism, Hedonic Calculus, 7 principles).
3)     Relative Ethics: Utiliatrianism (J.S. Mill, Rule Utilitarianism, The Harm Principle, Higher and Lower Pleasures, Strengths and weaknesses of the theory).
4)     Fertility Treatment (What is it? – IVF, AID, AIH, Donor Egg, Surrogacy, Why might it be used? Issues arising)
5)     Organ Transplants (What is it? Issues associated with opt-in/opt-out systems, religious views towards it)
6)     Absolute Ethics: Kant

(Who was Kant? Absolute Ethics, Universalisaibility, Humans as ends not means, Kingdom of ends, reason, duty, good will)

7)     Absolute Ethics: Kant

(Review, focus on good will, assess the theory, come to a conclusion)

8)     Genetic Engineering & Cloning
9)     Euthanasia

 

Religious Expressions in Society

Area
10)  Religious Art: What does religious expression mean? What makes art ‘religious’? How is religious art used?    
11)  Case Study: Light of the World
12)  How and why is Art used?
13)  Architecture Intro and case study (Taj Mahal/St. Michael’s Coventry)
14)  Impact of religious Architecture
15)  Intro to Music
16)  Impact of music
17)  Religion in the Media
18)  How is religion portrayed in the media?

 

 

Religion SL

These are the revision topics for your exam:

  • Human Rights:
  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights - what it is and why it is important
  • The Nuremburg Laws - how the holocaust happened
  • Definitions of Prejudice, discrimination and racism
  • Sophie Lancaster - an example of a Hate Crime
  • Stephen Lawrence - Institutional Racism
  • Martin Luther King

Remember the exam will test knowledge, understanding and evaluation.

There will be short questions to test your knowledge on the topics above and and a stimulus question with some material for you to read and then write a longer answer about. You cannot revise for this question - but it will be around the topics we have been thinking about in class. Read the question carefully and follow the instructions.

English

In addition to the Essential Grammar Knowledge, you should revise the Key Knowledge identified below; this Key Knowledge relates to each of the topics you have studied so far this year. If you are unsure about any of this material, please check your exercise book and class notes first, and then ask your teacher.  The End of Year Exam will consist of short questions, designed to test your understanding of the Key Knowledge that we want you to take into next year and beyond.


Year Group: 9

Term:  Autumn 2

Title of SOL:  Women in 19th Century / Victorian Literature (includes non-fiction research)

Key knowledge/concepts:

·       Language devices: personification, unreliable narrator, narrative voice,  antithesis, dramatic irony, epistolary work of fiction, foreshadowing, motifs, protagonist, situational irony, symbolism, verbal irony

·       Victorian context: patriarchy, the angel in the house, paternalistic culture, the subordination of women in marriage.


Year Group: 9

Term:  Autumn 1

Title of SOL: Modern Drama with Media Focus: Text and Film (An Inspector Calls)

Key knowledge/concepts:

·       Drama concepts: 3 act ‘well-made play’ ( involving a tight plot and a climax that takes place close to the end of the play); conflict and change; significance of stage directions;

·       An Inspector Calls: capitalism; socialism; social class and workers; responsibility; hypocrisy; generational conflict; gender

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

·       Additional terminology: mouthpiece; monologue; dramatic irony; props; repetition; pace; entrances and exits; interruptions; euphemisms


Year Group: 9

Term: Spring 1

Title of SOL: Poetry Comparison

Key knowledge/concepts:

·       Romanticism (including celebration of the natural world and the power of imagination)

·       Concept of a pattern of imagery (e.g. natural imagery, religious imagery);

·       Themes (explored across multiple poems)

·       Concept of poetic form (e.g. sonnet, dramatic monologue)

·       Concept and examples of different types of historical context (literary context, social and political context, biographical context)

SPAG knowledge and terminology:

Poetic terminology: irony; rhyme scheme; dramatic monologue; enjambment; caesura; speaker; simile; metaphor; personification; pronouns; onomatopoeia; alliteration; assonance; stanza; colloquial; antithesis; juxtaposition; rhythm (and various words and phrases for describing rhythm); tone (and various words for describing tone)


Year Group:  9

Term: Spring 2 and Summer 1

Title of SOL: War Writing  - Writing Focused SOL

Key knowledge/concepts:

Awareness of major World War I poets, e.g. Wilfred Owen

Concepts for war literature: death and loss; satire; attitudes to the enemy; love; patriotism; camaraderie

and friendship; the physical and psychological effects of battle


Literacy at JCG: Grammar Knowledge Complex sentence A sentence containing a dependent clause or clauses e.g. ‘Although Mary went home, John stayed at the party’. (Notice the commas).

Common Noun A word that is used to identify a class of people, places or things e.g. children, countryside, chairs. Fragments (can be used deliberately but often an error) Sentences that do not contain an independent clause e.g. ‘Late afternoon. She was clearly running late.’

Proper Noun A word use to name a particular people, place or thing e.g. Susan, Jersey, Nimbus3000. Coordinating Conjunctions A conjunction placed between clauses of equal importance (such as two independent clauses): For, And, But, Or, Yet, So (Remember: FANBOYS).

Pronoun A word that can replace a noun: I, You, He, She, It, They, Them, We. Subordinating Conjunctions A conjunction used to link dependent and independent clause to establish a time, place, reason, condition, concession or a comparison for the main clause: As, Because, Although, Though, Even Though, Whereas, If.

Adjective A word that is used to modify a noun e.g. ‘The tall teacher talked to the class.’ Comma – Lists , Used to separate items in a list.

Comparative adjective An adjective that is used to compare two people or things e.g. ‘The teacher is taller than me.’ Comma – separating Dependent and Independent Clauses , Used to separate dependent clauses from independent clauses (see examples above).

Superlative adjective An adjective that is used to compare one person or thing to every other member of a group of people or things e.g. ‘The teacher is the tallest person in the classroom.’ Comma – in a compound sentence , Used before a coordinating conjunction that joins two independent clauses

Verb A word used to describe an action, state or occurrence e.g. hear, become, happen. Comma Splices (an error to avoid) Two or more independent clauses separated by a comma.

Adverb A word that is used to modify a verb e.g. ‘He ran quickly.’ Speech marks “ Used to indicate that words are dialogue e.g. “This is excellent work”, said the teacher.

Sentence A group of words that is complete in itself (that makes sense). Quotation marks ‘ Used to indicate that words are quoted from a text e.g. In the first stanza, the poet uses the phrase ‘my love’.

Subject The person, place or thing that is carrying out an action or being something e.g. ‘The boy shouted loudly’ or ‘The boy is scared’. Semi-Colon ; Used to join two related independent clauses.

Object The person, place or thing that is having an action done to it e.g. ‘The boy shouted loudly into the megaphone.’ Colon : Used to precede lists, expansions or explanations. Also used for emphasis.

Independent Clause or

Main Clause

A clause that can stand alone as a sentence (because it makes sense on its own) e.g. ‘The cat sat on the mat’. Apostrophe – Possessive ‘ Used to indicate ownership.

Dependent Clause or

Subordinate Clause

A clause that depends on an independent clause to make sense e.g. ‘Without turning around, the cat sat on the mat’. Apostrophe – Omission ‘ Used to indicate a missing letter.

Embedded Clause A dependent clause that is embedded within an independent clause e.g. ‘The man, who appeared from nowhere, sat next to the cat’. (Notice the commas). Preposition of Time A word that indicates when something happens in time e.g. ‘During lesson one, the fire alarm rang.’

Simple sentence A sentence consisting of only one clause, with a single subject and predicate (a predicate is the part of a sentence that contains a verb, and says something about the subject). Preposition of Place A word that indicates where something happens in place e.g. ‘A fire broke out in Room 51.’

Compound sentence A sentence with more than one subject or predicate e.g. ‘John went home but Mary stayed at the party’ (here, two independent clauses are joined by a co-ordinating conjunction) The passive voice A grammatical construction in which the noun or noun phrase that would normally be the subject of the sentence becomes the object e.g. ‘The ball was kicked’.

Spelling = See the 15 Spelling Strategies in your Planner

Year 9 Key Knowledge Retrieval Practice
0.17142838 What is meant by the term 'well made play'?
0.8656473 What does it mean to say a character is an author's mouthpiece?
0.60975 What is a euphemism?
0.39199056 What is capitalism?
0.64606469 What is socialism?
0.01066361 What is hypocrisy?
0.34403284 What is meant by generational conflict?
0.06109559 What do semi-colons separate?
0.40490355 What is an unreliable narrator?
0.00854936 What is antithesis?
0.14474614 What is epistolary fiction?
0.37912866 Name three types of irony
0.92892752 What is meany by patriarchy?
0.17368946 What did Victorians mean  by 'the angel in the house'?
0.24600625 Give an example of symbolism from a text you've studied
0.47270333 What is personification?
0.15817481 Identify at least two features of Romanticism
0.99447132 What Is meant by the term a 'pattern of imagery'
0.48260319 Give two examples of themes in two different texts you have studied
0.75628575 How many lines does a sonnet have?
0.06887631 What is a dramatic monologue?
0.30320976 What do we mean by biographical context?
0.97339328 What is caesura?
0.13369466 What is antithesis?
0.65137188 What do we mean by tone?
0.62410134 What is patriotism?
0.58002075 What does camaraderie mean?
0.1397809 What is a satire?
0.00044928 What is a noun?
0.53133659 What is a dependent or subordinate clause?
0.56815566 During' is a preposition of…?
0.96420973 For what purpose do we use a semi-colon?
Drama

For this exam you are staging a scene from the musical Blood Brothers. The extract we have chosen is when the brothers are aged 14 and are at school. Edward is in a private school for boys and Mickey goes to the local mixed comprehensive. You will stage these scenes back to back and include a transition from one to another. You will need to add lines for the extras in the scenes i.e. other students. The adding of lines is part of your exam.

You must polish this piece well and work on the transition from one school to the other.  Consider including some of the techniques that you have learnt so far, such as tableaux, essence machines and obviously the creation of a character. This is the most important part of the exam. Accents are essential.

You will be put into groups or 7 to 8. As part of the task you must work well in class and arrange short rehearsals at lunch to ensure the piece is ready for the exam week deadline.

We would like you to costume these pieces as best you can. We have school ties to add a sense of location to the piece. For the exam we do not want you in PE kit. This is part of your exam so please take it seriously and in preparation time discuss what you will need to find with your group. The same applies to props. We have bits and pieces here if you are stuck. Create a list of props and we will tell you what we have and what you will need to find.

Lines must be learnt as part of the task.

The play will be examined during exam week (week of the 21st May).

You will be given a curriculum level (1-9) for this work, which will be entered on your report.

Good luck and work hard.

CD/DH​

Geography

The exam will be based on two topics: Natural hazards and Population

This document is designed to help you revise. You should use it alongside your class notes. In places there are some notes in the text - like the example about predicting and preparing for volcanoes. Don't feel that you have to use these notes, They are there to help you if you missed a lesson or feel you want to clarify things. You don't have to revise a new case study.

The Exam

The exam will take 45 minute (an hour if you have extra time). It will have two sections: one on Natural Hazards and one on Population. There will be a series of questions on each. The range of marks will be from 2 to 9 marks. You are advised to spend an equal amount of time on each section. A good rule is to spend a minute a mark - so a 4 mark question should take you 4 minutes.


Topic: Natural hazards What you need to know Example of type of question
Types of plate boundaries and their associated hazards What the plates look like and how to label them
How they cause earthquakes and volcanoes
Draw a destructive / constructive plate boundary Why do earthquakes and volcanoes occur at destructive/constructive plate boundaries?
Prediction and preparation for one tectonic hazard A case study of how people can manage hazards Explain how hazards can be managed
An example of the causes and effects of one hazard The causes and effects of one hazard Choosing one named hazard outline its causes and effects

Topic: Population What you need to know What you need to know
Population Pyramids How to read and interpret population pyramids The difference between ageing and youthful popuations
Demographic Transition Model What the DTM looks like and what the four stages of the model mean Label and complete the diagram of the DTM Explain the changes in the four stages of the model
China’s Population Policy China's One Child Policy The success and failures of this policy Describe and assess the success of the One child policy

Download here : Geography